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2008 nissan altima 2.5 s
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had the axles, wheel bearings, and front struts replaced.. a cpl weeks later, on the freeway at 80mph, the transmission stops shifting. Car sort of bogs down. Cant get any power out of it. If i shut it off and let it sit for a few minutes, its fine again, until the next time. I have recently replaced the battery (new), and alternator (junkyard) due to failure, and i know a similar issue will arise when the electrical current is weak, but what could be causing this? At a loss, and NOT a transmission guy. Fluid level is good, and reasonable in color.
 

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Possible causes:
1. - A common problem with random engine bog downs is a marginal camshaft position sensor or a marginal crankshaft position sensor. Most of the time when this happens, the "check engine light" never comes on; subsequently when performing an ECU code readout, there was no fault code set. There's been many members here on the forum that have had problems similar to yours and the fix was replacing those two sensors.

The best and cheapest fix for this situation is to replace both sensors at the same time; the reason for doing this is there is no way to determine which sensor is at fault with this type of condition. You can take your vehicle to a dealer/repair shop and they'll tell you there is nothing wrong after they go through with diagnostic tests because at that time the vehicle was running OK. You could end up spending $200 or much more depending on how much time/parts are used. When replacing sensors, always use Nissan OEM parts from a Nissan dealer; aftermarket electronic items generally are not reliable, don't last long, and many times are DOA. The sensors are not very expensive; around $75.

2. - You could have had an over-heated CVT. There are many conditions in the CVT that could cause the CVT to drop into "fail safe mode". The Transmission Control Module (TCM) has a fail-safe mode. The mode functions so that operation can be continued even if the signal circuit of the main electronically controlled input/output parts is damaged. One of the first things to do is perform an ECU/TCM code readout with a portable scan tool to see if any fault codes are set.

Here's a quote from VSTAR650CL: Sounds like the trans is overheating and going into self-protect mode. That won't light the MIL or throw codes, but the TCM will record them in values called CVT-A and CVT-B. Those are the "overheat flags" for the CVT. Get a dealer to read them out, if they aren't both zero then a hot CVT is your issue. Overheating was a significant issue on the early gen1 Rogues, there's a bulletin about it. If the trans hasn't been damaged, there's a Nissan cooler available or several good aftermarket coolers, get one installed. You should also get the fluid changed immediately, especially if it's never been changed before. Overheating kills the fluid in a hurry.
 

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Registered
2008 nissan altima 2.5 s
Joined
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2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Possible causes:
1. - A common problem with random engine bog downs is a marginal camshaft position sensor or a marginal crankshaft position sensor. Most of the time when this happens, the "check engine light" never comes on; subsequently when performing an ECU code readout, there was no fault code set. There's been many members here on the forum that have had problems similar to yours and the fix was replacing those two sensors.

The best and cheapest fix for this situation is to replace both sensors at the same time; the reason for doing this is there is no way to determine which sensor is at fault with this type of condition. You can take your vehicle to a dealer/repair shop and they'll tell you there is nothing wrong after they go through with diagnostic tests because at that time the vehicle was running OK. You could end up spending $200 or much more depending on how much time/parts are used. When replacing sensors, always use Nissan OEM parts from a Nissan dealer; aftermarket electronic items generally are not reliable, don't last long, and many times are DOA. The sensors are not very expensive; around $75.

2. - You could have had an over-heated CVT. There are many conditions in the CVT that could cause the CVT to drop into "fail safe mode". The Transmission Control Module (TCM) has a fail-safe mode. The mode functions so that operation can be continued even if the signal circuit of the main electronically controlled input/output parts is damaged. One of the first things to do is perform an ECU/TCM code readout with a portable scan tool to see if any fault codes are set.

Here's a quote from VSTAR650CL: Sounds like the trans is overheating and going into self-protect mode. That won't light the MIL or throw codes, but the TCM will record them in values called CVT-A and CVT-B. Those are the "overheat flags" for the CVT. Get a dealer to read them out, if they aren't both zero then a hot CVT is your issue. Overheating was a significant issue on the early gen1 Rogues, there's a bulletin about it. If the trans hasn't been damaged, there's a Nissan cooler available or several good aftermarket coolers, get one installed. You should also get the fluid changed immediately, especially if it's never been changed before. Overheating kills the fluid in a hurry.
Ok, the failsafe mode definitely makes sense to me, and sounds like my culprit. The engine itself doesnt bog down so much as the trans just doesnt respond to throttle input. Ill get on that in a hurry. At least as far as getting the codes read and confirming, from there its a matter of fixing the problem. Thanks so much. Been a huge help.
 
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