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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
UPDATE: November 2017. I'll be working on recovering the instructional photos for this thread.
Photobucket has restricted their 3rd party sharing at this time. Sorry for the inconvenience.
-Roger

Finally, I'm tearing down my 94 HB XE to replace all the old timing components, belts, and a 20 year old, deteriorating radiator, water pump, etc.

I'm taking a ton of pictures as I go through the process. I'll be posting up in stages between shifts working on the truck and taking breaks
to work on the write-up and photos.

Test post... okay, so this is where I start...


(!) Disconnect the negative cable end on the battery first thing ...you don't want anyone to accidentally bump the starter later,
especially after you get down to setting top-dead-center and removing the old timing chain and components. That could be catastrophic.

Easy enough to remove the intake plumbing... I also moved and disconnected as necessary those pesky vacuum hoses running in front of
the valvecover just to get them out of the way.
Just remember to mark anything and everything you need to so you'll be able to put everything back in its proper place upon reassembly later.
Baggies and a sharpie work real well to keep bolts in order.


Drain the coolant, disconnect the radiator hoses, remove the cooling fan (note, mine leaves the waterpump pulley bolted up because
I switched over to an electric fan some time back (see sticky for info), and remove the fan shroud and upper radiator mounting brackets,
then remove the radiator. Mine's a straight shift, but if yours is an automatic you'll most likely have some transmission cooler lines to disconnect from the lower part of the radiator.


This is where I like to break the crank bolt loose while it's still loaded with everything. It has less tendency to jump around letting all the torque go straight into the bolt.
Don't take the bolt out yet... you will need to find top-dead-center on cylinder #1 , and then get all the belts and pulleys off first.
There are also six 6mm bolts (10mm heads) holding the crankshaft pulleys and damper together. You do NOT need to take them apart.
I only did mine to turn the damper 180* to line up some previous timing marks someone had turned wrong at some time in the past.
Also, mark your belts, ID and direction of rotation, if you are going to reuse them.


Okay, this is the first most critical step explained... Look closely at the small notches in the rear of the crank pulley, and the pointer projecting out toward them from the timing cover
right in the center of the picture below.
You must roll your engine over by hand clockwise until you line those marks up. Before doing so, take the distributor cap cover, and cap off to note the position of the rotor button.
Look ahead at the next few pictures to see that small bolt holding the rotor button on to the distributor shaft. the head of that bolt should be facing you!
If not, roll the crankshaft another full rotation to the marks again.

(Ignore that yellow mark on the outside of the front crankshaft pulley. Someone had previously had it off and reinstalled it 180 degrees off from the crankshaft timing marks on mine.
I'll correct that when it goes back on later.)

Note the crankshaft timing marks (notches and pointer), and the small bolt that holds the ignition rotor button on (upper right hand corner just beyond the belt and pulley).
When you get the crank markings up and the rotor button pointed away from you, you "should" be able to identify and confirm that the rotor button contact is indeed point so that it
would line up with the #1 cylinder contact post inside the distributor cap, and that the spark plug wire going to the front cylinder (#1 ) confirms that. If there's any question,
stop at this point and go back over this until you are sure you are stopped right on cylinder #1 top-dead-center. I can't express this enough,
because this is where we see so many folks come back saying they can't seem to get it back in time again.




After I found top-dead-center on #1 , I took the belts, front crank pulley, waterpump pulley, power steering idler pulley and bracket, the waterpump, thermostst and housing, and the crankshaft bolt (loosened earlier) off.
I also removed the upper alternator bracket and bolts and set them aside to get them out of the way. I loosened the lower alternator bolt just enough to hinge the alternator down a bit and out of the way.
There's no need to remove it completely.


Before you pull the crankshaft damper pulley off you need to carefully note where you want it, and clearly mark both it and the distributor with any kind of bright paint,
or in my case my wife had some old nail polish around she no longer wanted, so I picked a spot and made sure I knew EXACTLY where my distributor should go in relation to the crank position when it goes back.
I decided to set my crank on the 20 degree "before top dead center" mark as pictured in the picture below, and mark everything else to time up correctly from there.

The TDC notch is the second one from the left, and if you feel better setting up the cam and crank timing there, then do it. I build engines and do this stuff as part of my job for a living and I always like to start here with the pistons down about 20 degrees or so to give me some extra clearance between the pistons and valves once the chain, tensioner and guides are off. Although It's not necessarily a problem on this particular engine, on some where the cam is "loaded", it can accidentally jump around part way and potentially bend valves. That is easily preventable, and I found that the camshaft on the KA is quite content to sit still on any of the timing marks available, so I'll let it go at that.


I marked a spot with paint on the upper edge and side of the body of the distributor closest to where the distributor was pointing once I had marked the crankshaft pulley. Once you're certain you have these clearly indexed for perfect alignment later then you can take the distributor hold down bolts out and work it back and forth until it comes up out of the timing cover. Be sure to make note of the end of the distributor drive and its position in relation to the front of the engine. It needs to end up exactly in that same position when you install it later during the oil pump installation. It may take several tries to get this right because the drive gear actually rotates some as it's being installed into position, but this is one of the most critical steps in the reassembly, so don't take the oil pump off or move the crankshaft until you note this, or mark this exactly. Take a scratch awl, pick, or any tool with a very sharp point and and a strait edge to make marks straight across the timing cover/ distributor seat with the half moon cut of the distributor shaft carefully noting where the raised half of the shaft is. Do NOT overlook this step!!! (I chose not to mark my timing cover because I'm replacing it with a new one.)
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I unbolted the power steering pump and laid it to the side. No need to remove it or take the hoses loose. Unbolt its bracket from the intake side of the cylinder head and I set it and its bolts out of the way together.
I Cleaned the front of the head with a steel brush and some brake clean, as well as sprayed off the oil pump, oh, and I took a mighty-vac and pulled all the coolant out of the engine's water jacket I could,
and then blew the block out with compressed air. I'm not dropping the oil pan, so I don't want to allow any coolant at all to enter the pan when I remove the timing cover. I'm ready to drop the oil pump.


Don't forget to take the two bolts out of the small coolant flange on the side of the thermostat housing, and the small bypass hose un-clamps and pushes off the back side.
If that bypass hose needs replacing, it's easiest to do once the front cover is out of the way. We are getting there.
Also, there's an oil vapor separator box just below the coolant thermostat on the side that has a few small bolts holding it on.
Remove them and push that box, with its hose in tact, out of the way toward the alternator. You will clean the flange and reseal it back to the front cover later.


Four 8mm bolts (12mm heads) hold the oil pump in place. Unless you are replacing it, carefully clean all the old gasket off and use a new gasket.


I wanted to also make note of the slot in the oil pump shaft so I can install the drive gear in the same position during re-installation later.


This is what you will be looking at when you get ready to put the oil pump back on later. Note the position of the distributor drive, and remember that it has to rotate into place as you push it up into the timing cover. It's okay to try to install it as many times as needed to get it pointed correctly. Your distributor rotor can't line up unless this does. Very important!


While you are under there, take the two front oil pan bolts out that hold the oil pan to the timing cover...
...and I backed two more off a bit that hold the pan to the block so I have a little wiggle space to work with while removing and reinstalling the front cover.
You can also get about three of the 6mm bolts (10mm heads) out of the lower front section of the timing cover from here.


So, let's get that front crankshaft damper pulley off. I have pullers, but found that my two $5.00 tire irons used very gently behind the pulley, worked well.


You should actually screw the crankshaft pulley bolt back in a few threads just so it will catch the pulley when it comes off the end of the crank.
I rushed, forgot it, and the pulley fell and punched a hole in my plastic oil drain pan. Ooops!


Don't forget to get all four small bolts around the front of the cylinder head. There's one up top around the thermostat side that's sort of hidden.


Now you are ready to remove all the rest of the timing cover bolts and tap the cover from the back and sides just hard enough to break it loose from the engine block, cylinder head, and oil pan.


Carefully slide the whole timing cover straight out keeping it even with the engine block so not to tear up the front section of the cylinderhead gasket that has to stay in place.
For illustration purposes, I tilted the cover over in front of the engine exposing the timing components and the oil pump/distributor drive shaft laying in place in the front cover.


So, if yours didn't fall out with the oil pump, you can remove the oil pump/distributor drive shaft now.
It's time to pull the front cover out of there and start the clean up and inspection process.
Note the small red o-ring type seal still stuck to the block!
There were two on this engine, and they are extremely critical to the proper sealing and flow of pressurized oil during normal engine operation.
Be sure to install the new ones correctly just prior to re-installing the timing cover.


Remove the oil slinger and the oil pump/distributor drive gear from the crankshaft if you intend to replace the lower timing chain cog, as do I.
Carefully note their orientation front to back. Also be aware of the half moon keys inserted into the crankshaft so not to lose any of them! No need to take them out.
Also, notice that I immediately stuffed some clean rags down between the lower front emgine block and in to the front oil pan cavity.
They will remain there through the whole cleaning process,
and through installing all of the new timing chain components and bolts to prevent dropping anything into the oil pan that's not suppose to be there.
If you chose to remove the oil pan then obviously this doesn't apply.


Oh yeah, and if you haven't already had the valve cover off, well you can do that now,
or in my case again since I keep it laying on top just to keep dust and debris out when not working in that area.


Inspect the old timing chain, tensioner, and rails. I found a lot of slack in the chain on mine even with the tensioner fully extended.
The gears are worn and the chain has stretched slightly. No doubt that I have found the cause of my timing chain rattle upon cold start up.


Now, break that camshaft bolt loose before you take any of the timing components off the front of the engine block.
If you don't have an impact to use, be sure to run a socket extension through the cam gear so you can hold it in place to keep the camshaft from turning. Very important!
Don't remove the bolt just yet, though. Double check that your camshaft gear index pin under the large bolt washer is still pointing fairly straight up and that nothing moved.


Take a 10mm socket and remove both 6mm bolts holding the chain tensioner on and remove the tensioner.


Now take the tensioner side rail pivot bolt out.


And then remove the two bolts, upper and lower, from the plastic rail on the other side and remove it.


Then you can remove the cam bolt that you loosened earlier and pull the cog and the chain straight off.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Just drop the cam gear and old chain straight down through the front of the cylinder head like so.




So here's day two for me, cleaning up the front of the engine block, the front underneath of the head gasket, and the oil pan area exposed.
I'll be mostly scraping with a razor blade scraper, then wiping it all down many times with clean rags and brake clean.

You don't want to do any scraping around the head gasket. Just wipe it gently with a rag and brake clean several times.

It's fairly critical that all the old sealer and any oil residue get completely removed so the new gasket maker sticks and seals completely.
It can't be too clean... just keep stuff out of the oil pan,
and don't gouge any aluminum surfaces with the scraper.

Don't skip this step! As an important part of the clean up, I removed the oil filter and used compressed air to blow back through
the oil hole in the front of the block that feeds the chain tensioner.

I also cleaned and blew air through the timing chain oiler sticking out just above the crank gear. If needed, you could use some carb cleaner to clean the oil passages.
Just try to keep it out of the oil pan. Flush out the oil pan with fresh oil later, if needed. This is also the best time to replace those rubber coolant bypass hoses if they are deteriorated,
cracking, swollen, or oil soaked and soft.



I installed the new crank gear, and then the distributor drive and oil slinger into position,
then the new cam gear and timing chain down and over the crank gear, and up into place on the camshaft.
Just leave the cam bolt finger tight for now.
Note the marks on the gear line up with the colored links on the chain.


And the bottom gear with slack on the tensioner side of the chain. It should all just hang here like this.


Install the rails. The straight guide rail came with new bolts. I put a dab of Loc-Tite on them.




Then the tensioner side rail and pivot bolt. I used Loc-Tite on the bolt threads and engine assembly lube on the chain and rails to protect from a dry start-up.


Double check your timing chain link to gear marks, and if all's well, install the new tensioner. I used a drop of Loc-Tite on those bolts, also.


And, now you can torque the cam gear bolt. I held the cam by using an extension and a socket that fit through a hole in the gear.


I prepared the timing cover. I used a new one but still needed to install the front crank or timing cover oil seal,
and I mounted the new waterpump to sort of use as a handle to aid with cover installation.


With the cover ready, the block and cover surfaces clean, timing components on, aligned, and torqued,
it's time to set the front cover oil seals in place.


Start applying sealer to the block and timing cover surfaces.
Be careful not to cause any damage to the front part of the cylinder head gasket...
just clean and apply enough sealer to cover well, especially up in the corners.
Carefully slide the timing cover in place, and start putting some of the longer 8mm bolts in.
As the cover pulls up closely you can start the four 6mm bolts that bolt the head down to the timing cover.
Don't forget the one around the head toward the intake manifold. It's hidden pretty well.
Mine looked pretty sloppy, but it's easy to remove the excess sealer once it sets up a little.


Reseal and install the crankcase oil vapor separator box pictured below in the center, the coolant flange, and bypass hoses.


Then the alternator bracket. Leave the alternator adjusting bolts loose for adjusting the belt later.


I couldn't find a good way to photograph the next step, because it takes two hands,
but I had plenty of room to slip the oil pump/distributor drive shaft up into the oil pump hole with one hand
while holding it in place from the top with a simple pocket magnet.

I'll admit, it took several attempts to get it turned and lined up correctly.
It must be pointed exactly where it was when you took the distributor out or you can't set the ignition timing correctly.


With my timing marks lined up, my distributor drive was pointed like this as referenced by this photo taken before I removed the oil pump.
It's good to have pictures!


With the oil pump mounting surfaces cleaned up, install the new oil pump gasket and bolt the oil pump up from the bottom.
Note that I left the pocket magnet suspended from the distributor hole to help keep the oil pump drive shaft in the timing cover.
You could use a pair of needle nose locking pliers to do this.
Picture of the oil pump bolted in place.
Note you may have to turn the oil pump gear down inside the pump a little with a straight screw driver to help it line up to the shaft above.



...more to come shortly!



I got it all back together and running today. It went very well considering it was a driveway project. I kinda rushed the installation stage because I was falling behind with other home projects,
but I'll post up the remainder of pics just as soon as I can. Hopefully all the photos and new write-up will help others out facing this job on their own KA.

~Roger
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Here's the nearly finished product all clean and ready to go to the last steps.
I set the distributor in, making sure I had the rotor button turned to #1 in the firing order.
Make sure the marks on the crank pulley still line up with the pointer, and torque that front crank bolt!

I trimmed the excess sealer off the mating surfaces to give a real clean look.
And, rechecked the oil pan bolts, tightened the oil pan drain plug, and added oil, pouring most of it down over the new chain and rails to help prevent dry starting.

I had also filled both the oil pump and oil filter prior to installation.
I do this with every engine I build. No dry starts for me!


I replaced the old valve cover gasket, putting a dab of sealer on the half moon seals,
bolted all the rest of the brackets up, the power steering pump, AC idler, water pump pulley, belts, adjusting as I went, radiator with electric fan in place,
electrical connections, hoses, and new coolant.

I test ran it a while, let it cool down to recheck all the fluids, and make sure there were no leaks. Checked the ignition timing per the service manual,
and re-tightened all the new belts a little.
Guess what???

NO MORE TIMING CHAIN NOISE!!!
Yay! Mission accomplished... and I swear, it not only sounds better... I actually think it runs better.
It was worth all the trouble, and I hope this article helps some one else get theirs done.

Happy motoring!

-Roger
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Great write-up and good pictures along the way! I'm sure this will help answer many questions.
Thanks rogoman! There's a lot of good info in the other timing chain sticky, but I wanted to capture as much as possible with new pics since all of the others are gone.

As timing chains go, our 2.4 isn't bad at all. There's so much room in the engine compartment to work versus nearly every other vehicle out there.

-R
 

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Incredible write up, Roger! Awesome combination of pictures and text.

I've owned my '97 4WD XE for five years now and it's rattled the whole time on start-up. I keep telling myself I'm gonna' dive in...and I chicken out.

When I do finally work up the courage, I'll definitely be making reference to your write-up.

Cheers!
Grug
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Incredible write up, Roger! Awesome combination of pictures and text.

I've owned my '97 4WD XE for five years now and it's rattled the whole time on start-up. I keep telling myself I'm gonna' dive in...and I chicken out.

When I do finally work up the courage, I'll definitely be making reference to your write-up.

Cheers!
Grug
Thanks, Grug!
I knew if I ever got around to doing it I was going to take my time, and it really wasn't hard to shoot some pics as I went. It's probably harder to upload and post the pics up with some text than actually do the job, but I felt the HB Truck forum really needed these added since most of the pics were missing from the only other write-up of the timing chain service. It's not perfect, but I gave it my best shot, so I hope it helps someone out a little.

BTW, my cold start up rattle has been completely gone. Even leaving the truck sitting several days at a time ...cold, as well as hot starts are quiet now. That said, I didn't find any damage inside my engine from running it with the rattle. Still, I feel better about it all now.
-Roger
 

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timing check

I am in this situation and need help.I didn't mark the oil pump or dst. happen when head bolt broke and had to removed head and cam sprocket, could not recover from tensioner took cover off replaced chain. I guess that TDC is taken from the #1 cylinder at #1 plug hole on left side of engine as you stand in front of truck. also all I read is to align marks on crank keys at 12 oclock, crank sprocket dot too right, cam pin 12:00 in hole#2. bright links on crank dot and #2 on cam outside dot. install guides .this I have done, but when I rotate crank to check (4 turns) I.m always 1 tooth off . 2 if I continue to turn and so on. can this check be done? would save redo after placing cover and everything else on.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am in this situation and need help.I didn't mark the oil pump or dst. happen when head bolt broke and had to removed head and cam sprocket, could not recover from tensioner took cover off replaced chain. I guess that TDC is taken from the #1 cylinder at #1 plug hole on left side of engine as you stand in front of truck. also all I read is to align marks on crank keys at 12 oclock, crank sprocket dot too right, cam pin 12:00 in hole#2. bright links on crank dot and #2 on cam outside dot. install guides .this I have done, but when I rotate crank to check (4 turns) I.m always 1 tooth off . 2 if I continue to turn and so on. can this check be done? would save redo after placing cover and everything else on.
This sounds completely normal. The colored chain links will not line back up with the marks on the cam and crank gears for many, many rotations. Because of that you don't check the timing mark positions this way. You set it all in time with the colored links once, and then note the relationship of all your marks to their corresponding positions in the head and block. Two full rotations of the crankshaft should always put the gears and distributor back to the same initial point of TDC. You must completely ignore the colored chain links once rotated beyond the initial set up.

-R
 

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This sounds completely normal. The colored chain links will not line back up with the marks on the cam and crank gears for many, many rotations. Because of that you don't check the timing mark positions this way. You set it all in time with the colored links once, and then note the relationship of all your marks to their corresponding positions in the head and block. Two full rotations of the crankshaft should always put the gears and distributor back to the same initial point of TDC. You must completely ignore the colored chain links once rotated beyond the initial set up.

-R
thanks for all the help. this truck has been in my driveway for months and the wife on me to junk it, so this is my last try to bring it off life support. At this point I have read severals threads and have reached this point. crank gear, chain, cam sprocket ,guides, tensioner, cover, oil pump are on. crankshaft is at 12:00 also cam pin[in #2 HOLE] bright links on marks. next went to put pulley on crank but marks do not match. points at 10 not zero. my question is what can I do at this point. turn crank to zero while it and cam are still together and continue or take everything apart and start over. according to the wooden dowel test I,m at TDC.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
thanks for all the help. this truck has been in my driveway for months and the wife on me to junk it, so this is my last try to bring it off life support. At this point I have read severals threads and have reached this point. crank gear, chain, cam sprocket ,guides, tensioner, cover, oil pump are on. crankshaft is at 12:00 also cam pin[in #2 HOLE] bright links on marks. next went to put pulley on crank but marks do not match. points at 10 not zero. my question is what can I do at this point. turn crank to zero while it and cam are still together and continue or take everything apart and start over. according to the wooden dowel test I,m at TDC.
The bright links lining up with the cam gear and again at the crank gear are all you need to be really concerned with, at least until you drop the distributor into the front cover. The dowel test is off just a little. If the crank pulley keys on to the crank at 10 degrees, then the crankshaft is at ten degrees.

Regardless of the crank degree indication, those chain links still have to have been installed just as illustrated or the cam and crank won't be in sync with each other. Once that's right you can turn the crank and pulley to "0" or anywhere you want it ...the cam will follow.

-R
 

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Just drop the cam gear and old chain straight down through the front of the cylinder head like so.




So here's day two for me, cleaning up the front of the engine block, the front underneath of the head gasket, and the oil pan area exposed.
I'll be mostly scraping with a razor blade scraper, then wiping it all down many times with clean rags and brake clean.

You don't want to do any scraping around the head gasket. Just wipe it gently with a rag and brake clean several times.

It's fairly critical that all the old sealer and any oil residue get completely removed so the new gasket maker sticks and seals completely.
It can't be too clean... just keep stuff out of the oil pan,
and don't gouge any aluminum surfaces with the scraper.

Don't skip this step! As an important part of the clean up, I removed the oil filter and used compressed air to blow back through
the oil hole in the front of the block that feeds the chain tensioner.

I also cleaned and blew air through the timing chain oiler sticking out just above the crank gear. If needed, you could use some carb cleaner to clean the oil passages.
Just try to keep it out of the oil pan. Flush out the oil pan with fresh oil later, if needed. This is also the best time to replace those rubber coolant bypass hoses if they are deteriorated,
cracking, swollen, or oil soaked and soft.



I installed the new crank gear, and then the distributor drive and oil slinger into position,
then the new cam gear and timing chain down and over the crank gear, and up into place on the camshaft.
Just leave the cam bolt finger tight for now.
Note the marks on the gear line up with the colored links on the chain.


And the bottom gear with slack on the tensioner side of the chain. It should all just hang here like this.


Install the rails. The straight guide rail came with new bolts. I put a dab of Loc-Tite on them.




Then the tensioner side rail and pivot bolt. I used Loc-Tite on the bolt threads and engine assembly lube on the chain and rails to protect from a dry start-up.


Double check your timing chain link to gear marks, and if all's well, install the new tensioner. I used a drop of Loc-Tite on those bolts, also.


And, now you can torque the cam gear bolt. I held the cam by using an extension and a socket that fit through a hole in the gear.


I prepared the timing cover. I used a new one but still needed to install the front crank or timing cover oil seal,
and I mounted the new waterpump to sort of use as a handle to aid with cover installation.


With the cover ready, the block and cover surfaces clean, timing components on, aligned, and torqued,
it's time to set the front cover oil seals in place.


Start applying sealer to the block and timing cover surfaces.
Be careful not to cause any damage to the front part of the cylinder head gasket...
just clean and apply enough sealer to cover well, especially up in the corners.
Carefully slide the timing cover in place, and start putting some of the longer 8mm bolts in.
As the cover pulls up closely you can start the four 6mm bolts that bolt the head down to the timing cover.
Don't forget the one around the head toward the intake manifold. It's hidden pretty well.
Mine looked pretty sloppy, but it's easy to remove the excess sealer once it sets up a little.


Reseal and install the crankcase oil vapor separator box pictured below in the center, the coolant flange, and bypass hoses.


Then the alternator bracket. Leave the alternator adjusting bolts loose for adjusting the belt later.


I couldn't find a good way to photograph the next step, because it takes two hands,
but I had plenty of room to slip the oil pump/distributor drive shaft up into the oil pump hole with one hand
while holding it in place from the top with a simple pocket magnet.

I'll admit, it took several attempts to get it turned and lined up correctly.
It must be pointed exactly where it was when you took the distributor out or you can't set the ignition timing correctly.


With my timing marks lined up, my distributor drive was pointed like this as referenced by this photo taken before I removed the oil pump.
It's good to have pictures!


With the oil pump mounting surfaces cleaned up, install the new oil pump gasket and bolt the oil pump up from the bottom.
Note that I left the pocket magnet suspended from the distributor hole to help keep the oil pump drive shaft in the timing cover.
You could use a pair of needle nose locking pliers to do this.
Picture of the oil pump bolted in place.
Note you may have to turn the oil pump gear down inside the pump a little with a straight screw driver to help it line up to the shaft above.



...more to come shortly!



I got it all back together and running today. It went very well considering it was a driveway project. I kinda rushed the installation stage because I was falling behind with other home projects,
but I'll post up the remainder of pics just as soon as I can. Hopefully all the photos and new write-up will help others out facing this job on their own KA.

~Roger
hi;
beautiful job done. thanks. i'm a carpenter and did the chains with no previous experience. only found your article now, long after doing the job.
But, now i find the teeth on the oil pump drive spindle and oil pump drive gear are both all broken. it has been running (at 208k miles) for the last year as if it just came out of the factory and suddenly, one moment to the next, died and won't start. and it is the timing, and it is the oil pump/ distributer drive spindle. it spins because the teeth are gone. i got a new one and it is trashed already just trying to start it. i'm going to replace the two pieces,spindle and oil pump drive gear but my question is, what on earth can cause those teeth to get so damaged? thanks a million.
prem
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hey Prim,
I could only speculate that the gears were oil starved due to a residual carbon blockage in the oil passage to the lower timing chain oiler (small protruding stud just above the lower timing chain crankshaft gear). It's such a tiny port that almost anything could block it causing a problem later. While I had mine apart, I sprayed carb cleaner into the oiler in such a way as to clean its jet like orifice, much like cleaning carburetor jets, but I found it very difficult to confirm that it was open enough to work correctly. There's no real good way to pressurize the oiler with the front of the engine apart. Air pressure into the oil filter passage was only partially successful in checking to see if the chain oiler orifice was sufficiently clean.

-Roger
 

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spindle;

thanks roger;
i will pay attention to the oil passages and do my best to see that they are clear.
the compressed air you mention is a great idea.
i'm in hawaii and have to order parts and i just got the post office notice they have arrived.
so, the timing(sic) is perfect. i'll be doing the job in the next few days.
thanks a million.
i'll let you know what i find.
prem
 

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Nissan Owner
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497 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
In hindsight I had to be a little more careful due to making the decision not to remove the oil pan. It may have been more "by the book" to go ahead and remove it to do the job, but I understand that it's a real pain to do on the 4wd models. I just took my time, and with care, and lots of rags, I was able to keep trash out of the oil pan and still slide the new cover in place with no problems.

-R
 

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Nissan Owner
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497 Posts
Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
*Nice Documentary on doing a Timing Chain replacement for the 2.4 liter Nissan KA24E motor.

*I tryed to post my pics to verify the mileage on my '97 Nissan Pick-up.

*How did you post the nice photos?


all I can seem to do is post pics from some various web URLS, or website addresses.
such as:

Nissan Forum - View Profile: Shut-Trip
Thanks, Shut-Trip! This is a bit off topic but I'll try to help. The best way I've found is to upload your own pics to a photo host, such as Flickr, Webshots, Photobucket, Smug-mug, Dropbox, Google+. etc. There are lots more, I'm sure. Then, once hosted, all you have to do is copy the URL for any photo and link it in a post here by using the "Insert Image" box in the top of the message header. It looks like a box with a tiny mountain, sky, and sun. Just click on it and follow the prompts in the pop up box.
 

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Thank you Mr.Roger.
Your explicit details with the walkthrough
turned my hunk a junk into a truck with a lil
spunk.Thanks once again
Joseph Sikes
 
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