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Discussion Starter #1
So I am in middle of doing my timing belt service and I’ve pretty much got the cams and crank lined with the marks on the engine.

The Problem is that the marks on the timing belt itself are only lining up with the cams but aren’t in line with the crank by like 3-4 teeth, am I doing something wrong? Confusing 😅
 

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Sup Mod keeping the peace
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Before you started to remove the old timing belt, did you set the #1 cylinder to TDC on the compression stroke? To verify that, the crank pulley timing mark should be in line with the timing cover zero mark and all four valves must be closed; at this point do not turn the crankshaft, only turn the cams if needed for alignment. You should be lining up the marks on the timing belt with the marks on the sprockets rather then the marks on the rear timing cover. The arrow on the belt needs to point towards the front. If done correctly, you'll notice the marks on the rear timing cover may be off slightly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
So I do have it at #1 Cylinder TDC, but when I put the belt on it still lines up with the 2 cams but not the mark on the crank sprocket
 

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Sup Mod keeping the peace
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If it's at TDC as you say, just insure that all 4 valves are fully closed and the crank pulley timing mark is in line with the timing cover zero mark before proceeding any further. At this point remove your new timing belt and start with aligning the crankshaft white line on the belt with the crankshaft sprocket mark. Now go around to each cam sprocket and line up the white line on the belt with the sprocket mark; if the marks are off, adjust the given cam clockwise or counter clockwise for alignment. Hopefully you had the belt tensioner removed prior to setting the timing.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here are some Pictures(I have the old belt on but it’s the same with the new belt), I double checked to make sure the crank is on the zero degree mark with the timing cover and it is, now if I line the crank mark with the belt, both cams are off by one tooth, if I line the cams with the belt, the crank is off one tooth.

If anything should I move the cams over slightly? Idk

6432

6433

6434
 

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Sup Mod keeping the peace
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Leave the crank sprocket alignment where it is and re-adjust a cam sprocket to the proper alignment. Do that for all 4 cam sprockets. Now you should be timed correctly. There a certain procedure for setting the proper belt tension by adjustment of the automatic tensioner. If you're following the FSM, it's in there.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Okay I can do that, there’s only 2 cam sprockets so do I just move one or both? And how far off the mark on the timing cover can it be?
 

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NF Mod/Nissan Master Tech
2006 Pathfinder LE, 2003 Frontier SVE
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Forget about the marks on the timing cover; they are always a tooth off of where they should be! Trust me, I've done hundreds of VG timing belts over the years! All you need to be concerned about is the marks on the timing belt and the dots on the cam and crank sprockets. The new belt should have three lines on it: one dashed and two solid, plus an arrow on it. When you are at the front of the vehicle and looking at the engine, the right bank will be on your left, because direction is always taken from the perspective of the driver's seat. That said, the dashed line matches up with the timing mark on the right bank cam sprocket. The arrow should point forward towards the radiator. The solid lines on the timing belt will then line up to the timing marks on the left bank cam sprocket and crank sprocket, respectively. If those lines on the belt are matched to the timing marks on the sprocket, then you are mechanically "in time" and at #1 TDC. For general reference, the cam timing mark is usually at the 5 o'clock position and the cam sprockets usually sit a tooth off of the marks on the rear timing cover. Don't ask me why; it's just the way it is!
So, tensioning the belt is important! Too tight and it will whine. Here's my tried and true method for perfect VG timing belt tension once you get the belt installed and loosen the tensioner nut:

Turn the right bank (passenger side) cam sprocket counter-clockwise about three teeth; the tensioner will take in the slack. Torque the tensioner nut to 35 lb-ft. Then, turn the right bank cam sprocket clockwise about three teeth. This will pull any slack between the two cam sprockets. Take your thumb and index finger and twist the timing belt at the middle of the span between the two cam sprockets. You should be able to turn it 90-degrees. If you can't, it's too tight. If you can twist it more than 90-degree, it's too loose. If too loose or too tight, repeat the procedure. Works for me every time!
 
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