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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
feel free to chime in on this one, VStar650CL . I would like to hear/read your opinion ( and from all others!)
So far for the canadians amongst us, the Nissan Xtrail was a pretty good little suv when it came out and for most of us, served us dutifully and somewhat reliably. I have really enjoyed my 2006 Xtrail and it still runs very good since i purchased it used in 2015. But there will come a time soon when i will most likely need to ditch it and buy another (used ) japanese compact suv within my price range.
In the meantime, i'm noticing more and more brand new nissan Rogues in my city . The professional online reviews seem pretty positive so far.
I noticed a new Rogue parked up my block about a month ago and it looks very shark in the cement gray paint scheme. The 2.5 L, 4 cylinder engine is not overly powerful but i read adequate and the cvt transmission i read are much better/supposedly more reliable then the first generation of nissan cvts. The 2.5L I-4 with 181 hp and 181 lb-ft of torque and decent fuel economy versus my 2006 xtrail 2.5L with only 165 hp and decent fuel economy ( for it's era).
I just read the new Rogue now will offer a turbo 3 cylinder. Hmmmmmm. (
2022 Nissan Rogue Adds VC-Turbo Three-Cylinder for Better MPG, More Power
Replacing the old 2.5-liter four-cylinder, the new variable-compression engine makes 201 hp and boasts up to 33 mpg combined. <<<< Car and Driver.
I think i'd wait 2-3 years and let other buyers figure out if that combination is a good choice or another piece of crap...lol.
Anyways......anybody on here buy the newest Rogue or contemplating it? With either the 2.5L or the upcoming optional turbo 3? 2022 Nissan Rogue Adds VC-Turbo Three-Cylinder for Better MPG, More Power
and 2022 Nissan Rogue Buyer's Guide: Reviews, Specs, Comparisons
one last blah blahs....IF i did have the cash to buy a new compact suv.....probably be a hybrid. The 2020-21 Toyota Rav4 Hybrid XLE or xse. It has that sweet spot ( for me at least) of 40 mpg, proven hybrid technology, 0-60 0f about 7.2-7.5 secs, just the right size inside and out, reliability, resale value, etc , etc. And the potential for Gov't rebates, making it more affordable to purchase.
BUT!....Who knows, nissan may soon offer a Hybrid or plug in Rogue very soon. That could also be an excellent alternative. 2020 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid Review, Pricing, and Specs


Head Eye Human body Purple Violet
 

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Our DTS came into the dealership some months back driving a pre-production 3-banger, and I must say, it was very ballsy and very smooth. People don't realize that a vertical triple is the most stable engine design short of a boxer, it has less harmonic losses than a V8. That's part of the reason the Kawi H-series triples were the fastest things on 2 wheels back in their day. Couple that with VC and a turbo, I think the setup will be a winner. The block is basically 3/4's of a QR20, and we've had a number of VC Altimas roll in with over 100K on the clock now, so I don't think reliability in either aspect will be an issue. Like any turbo, just keep the oil fresh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Our DTS came into the dealership some months back driving a pre-production 3-banger, and I must say, it was very ballsy and very smooth. People don't realize that a vertical triple is the most stable engine design short of a boxer, it has less harmonic losses than a V8. That's part of the reason the Kawi H-series triples were the fastest things on 2 wheels back in their day. Couple that with VC and a turbo, I think the setup will be a winner. The block is basically 3/4's of a QR20, and we've had a number of VC Altimas roll in with over 100K on the clock now, so I don't think reliability in either aspect will be an issue. Like any turbo, just keep the oil fresh.
thanks for the reply. I wonder tho if a tiny 3 cylinder engine with turbo will have issues early on. If on the occasions the vehicle is weighed down with 4 humans and some cargo/suitcases, camping gear ....the engine/tranny will be under great strain and things break down/wear out too early. I realize that most small compact suvs are typically driven by just the driver during work commutes or grocery gettings. Maybe as you say, it will be a stout and powerful little engine that will be just fine with no major worries.
The other thing is that with the Ford ''Ecoboost'' engines, i've read that the engines are so small and work very hard . That drivers tend to step on the throttle more heavily and the mpg savings go out the window.
Do you think the nissan turbo 3s will be better then the ford ecoboosts motors or get about the same results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Like I said, it's 3/4 of a QR. The QR20 and QR25 are about the stoutest 4-bangers ever built, and the 3-cyl won't need to lose horses to a balancer chain the way the 4's do.
Cool.
So what are your thoughts on the latest Rogue? With the regular 2.5L / cvt combo.
And you have any insider scoop news if there will be a Rogue hybrid/phev alongside with it's twin, the Mitsu Outlander??
 

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I guess a hybrid is possible down the road, but the gen2 hybrid wasn't a great seller so I dunno. I'd imagine they're expecting the lion's share of the electric crowd to be looking at the new Ariya. The gen3 is a great platform, but I'm sure you've noticed there are a few firmware gremlins that Nissan hasn't dealt with yet. That stuff takes time, the gen2's took took a good 2-1/2 years before I would've called them "fully shaken out". I don't expect the gen3 to be any different.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I guess a hybrid is possible down the road, but the gen2 hybrid wasn't a great seller so I dunno. I'd imagine they're expecting the lion's share of the electric crowd to be looking at the new Ariya. The gen3 is a great platform, but I'm sure you've noticed there are a few firmware gremlins that Nissan hasn't dealt with yet. That stuff takes time, the gen2's took took a good 2-1/2 years before I would've called them "fully shaken out". I don't expect the gen3 to be any different.
if you don't mind offering some more hybrid advice on here ( or in pv message)....what do you think of the new nissan Leaf? I like the way the current one looks inside and out, the two battery choices offered. Too bad only front wheel drive.
I think kinda pricey in Canada....from CAN$37,498 . The Leaf S Plus is now $40,098; the Leaf SV Plus is $43,098 . Of course i'd want only the SV Plus as it is more peppy and bit more sporty looking. Possibility of govt rebates of around $5500 or more. But dammit, i've only started owing suvs in 2015 with my 06 Xtrail....i prefer nowadays compact , 4 dr japanese awd suvs. Got bored of decades of cars/hatchbacks ownership. Even once had a brand new nissan hardbody extracab pickup back when Fred Flintstone was still in diapers . Back then i really wanted a Nissan Pathfinder, but i was too young and they were just too pricey for me and my low wage minimum paying jobs.
- ideally i like to continue with something Japanese, 4 dr, suv, 4 cylinder...possibly with turbo. Hybrid if affordable.
if i ever win the big lottery jackpot i'm gonna go buy a special hybrid. A 1955-57 Chevy Belair restomod with 600hp + hybrid . But i want it to have the option of at least sounding like i'm driving the Bullitt movie cars of the mustang or the charger. :) For now i will have to just listen to them cars on my new bluetooth speakers.
 

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Living in the Vancouver metro, even the regular Leaf would probably serve you well enough. The Pluses are a flat-out hoot to drive. Most people don't realize what great stoplight fighters they are. There's a guy on another site who has a Plus and also a blown 550 hp SR20 project car. The Leaf trashes it for about first 30 meters. Electric motors and traction control were made for one another, and those little buggers will snap your neck without so much as a little bo peep from the tires. I can't imagine what the high-end Ariya will be like with those motors at both ends. Holy crap.

The big problem with EV's has always been the same, range. The early Leafs only got a bit over 160 km, and here in Arkansas where many towns are 60 and 70 km from one another, once the battery lost a bit of capacity you were taking chances without getting a charge at both ends. That made it impractical for, say, someone commuting from Arkadelphia or Conway to Little Rock. People in rural Canada would have the same issues. The new batteries are much improved (even the one in the standard Leaf) and will be usable for a lot more people than the old ones.

Mind you, I still don't think there's any real future for plug-in EV's. They're not even particularly green, since their pollution footprint depends entirely on the powerplant that fuels them. Ours in central Arkansas are green as hell because we're nuclear, but we're the exception and not the rule. Those gazillion EV's rolling off the lines for use in China are way dirtier than any modern gasser here in North America, because they're largely fueled by the dirtiest coal-fired powerplants imaginable. The real future, when the technology catches up, will be fuel-cell hybrids that crack methane into hydrogen from a methane tank onboard the vehicle, then use the hydrogen fuel to charge and power an EV drivetrain. That way you can fuel up with methane just like fueling with gasoline, then not only go anywhere after a 5 minute stop at a "gas" station, but have a truly green footprint to boot. Water coming out the tailpipe, plus a trap for soot carbon that you can use in your garden. The great EV technology being developed right now will play a part in all that, but it will be a means and not an end. Plug-in EV's are not what our grandchildren will drive.

But I digress. For here-and-now, I have almost nothing negative to say about the Leaf, especially if you have a place for a home charger and don't need to park on the street. The Pluses (and soon all of them) have fast-charge capability for when it's needed, and enough range to keep about 90% of the population happy. Most of all, they're fun. Drive one, you'll see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Living in the Vancouver metro, even the regular Leaf would probably serve you well enough. The Pluses are a flat-out hoot to drive. Most people don't realize what great stoplight fighters they are. There's a guy on another site who has a Plus and also a blown 550 hp SR20 project car. The Leaf trashes it for about first 30 meters. Electric motors and traction control were made for one another, and those little buggers will snap your neck without so much as a little bo peep from the tires. I can't imagine what the high-end Ariya will be like with those motors at both ends. Holy crap.

The big problem with EV's has always been the same, range. The early Leafs only got a bit over 160 km, and here in Arkansas where many towns are 60 and 70 km from one another, once the battery lost a bit of capacity you were taking chances without getting a charge at both ends. That made it impractical for, say, someone commuting from Arkadelphia or Conway to Little Rock. People in rural Canada would have the same issues. The new batteries are much improved (even the one in the standard Leaf) and will be usable for a lot more people than the old ones.

Mind you, I still don't think there's any real future for plug-in EV's. They're not even particularly green, since their pollution footprint depends entirely on the powerplant that fuels them. Ours in central Arkansas are green as hell because we're nuclear, but we're the exception and not the rule. Those gazillion EV's rolling off the lines for use in China are way dirtier than any modern gasser here in North America, because they're largely fueled by the dirtiest coal-fired powerplants imaginable. The real future, when the technology catches up, will be fuel-cell hybrids that crack methane into hydrogen from a methane tank onboard the vehicle, then use the hydrogen fuel to charge and power an EV drivetrain. That way you can fuel up with methane just like fueling with gasoline, then not only go anywhere after a 5 minute stop at a "gas" station, but have a truly green footprint to boot. Water coming out the tailpipe, plus a trap for soot carbon that you can use in your garden. The great EV technology being developed right now will play a part in all that, but it will be a means and not an end. Plug-in EV's are not what our grandchildren will drive.

But I digress. For here-and-now, I have almost nothing negative to say about the Leaf, especially if you have a place for a home charger and don't need to park on the street. The Pluses (and soon all of them) have fast-charge capability for when it's needed, and enough range to keep about 90% of the population happy. Most of all, they're fun. Drive one, you'll see.
Thing about Vancouver, the metro area is approaching 3 million pop. We are right on the coast and also on the american border. After you drive away from the city outer limits, the distances can be far before you hit a small town. Could be 75 klms, 100, 200...500klms, 800klms, etc.
So yes, in the metro area a phev would be fine. But i like the hybrids for the gas panic convenience factor.
The Rav4 Prime would be the ultimate for me. A 700+klm driving range. A 40 mpg hwy . I believe it will go 70-73klms range on just the battery . Toyota asking over $45,000 cnd. More likely with a few options at $45,000. Plus taxes, destination. Too spendy for me, even with a $5500 + rebate.
I read a few times a new hybrid vehicle buyer has to figure out how many years it takes to break even and start seeing a cost savings . Sometimes 5-8 years. That sometimes a person is better of buying a used toyota corolla gas engine car , get 32-38 mpg and not go spend $30-50K on a hybrid , wait 5-8 years , then see the savings of buying less gas.
 

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Fuel mileage is a faux argument anyway when applied to switching cars. Here's a very cogent breakdown from a good friend on another site, vis a guy who was considering swapping in an old Xterra for a new 40 mpg Altima:

"The economics of fuel economy simply don't add up. It's a sales and marketing ploy that plays on the segment of the population who don't math very well.

Let's break it down. Becky drives a '14 Xterra Pro-4x 6MT with 120k miles. We got it at 23k miles, IIRC. but that's not relevant. It gets 18 mpg (for sake of argument; she's got a light foot). Assuming $3.78 per gallon for 87 octane, and carrying on.

If I trade it in on a new 2.5 Premium Alty ($32,500 MSRP), and let's say that car gets "up to 27 city / 37 highway", so we'll call it 32mpg in mixed driving. We could get $18k in trade, so let's just fantasize that a dealer lets the Alty go for $15k and our Xterra. (we all know after TTL and other BS, it's a lot higher). Factor in higher insurance and higher costs of annual registration and you have another $1500 in costs for the Alty).

But let's JUST use the price difference for now. $15k buys 3,968 gallons of fuel. At 18mpg, she'll drive 71,500 miles (basically, taking the X to the end of its useful lifespan for a commuter). That additional $1500 buys 397 more gallons of fuel, or another 7150 miles (78,643 miles). At 200k, we'd probably sell it on the open market and pull $12k cash.

Keeping and maintaining a functional older vehicle, even if it gets poor MPG (such as the Pathy / Xterra) is always the fiscally intelligent choice. Marketing and hype don't play nice with math and statistics. It's simply car salesman voodoo and we've been guzzling it for decades.

Buy a different car because you want it, but don't parade it about as a fiscally smart move. When you have the means (which we all do), drive what you WANT and let the talking heads wring their hands over fuel prices to a less-intelligent audience."


Now in this case, the gent likes the Altima anyway and will probably be happy as a pig in slop with an AWD turbo SV model that he can flog the crap out of but still has fuel-legs like Betty Grable. That's a good reason. Fuel isn't.
;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Fuel mileage is a faux argument anyway when applied to switching cars. Here's a very cogent breakdown from a good friend on another site, vis a guy who was considering swapping in an old Xterra for a new 40 mpg Altima:

"The economics of fuel economy simply don't add up. It's a sales and marketing ploy that plays on the segment of the population who don't math very well.

Let's break it down. Becky drives a '14 Xterra Pro-4x 6MT with 120k miles. We got it at 23k miles, IIRC. but that's not relevant. It gets 18 mpg (for sake of argument; she's got a light foot). Assuming $3.78 per gallon for 87 octane, and carrying on.

If I trade it in on a new 2.5 Premium Alty ($32,500 MSRP), and let's say that car gets "up to 27 city / 37 highway", so we'll call it 32mpg in mixed driving. We could get $18k in trade, so let's just fantasize that a dealer lets the Alty go for $15k and our Xterra. (we all know after TTL and other BS, it's a lot higher). Factor in higher insurance and higher costs of annual registration and you have another $1500 in costs for the Alty).

But let's JUST use the price difference for now. $15k buys 3,968 gallons of fuel. At 18mpg, she'll drive 71,500 miles (basically, taking the X to the end of its useful lifespan for a commuter). That additional $1500 buys 397 more gallons of fuel, or another 7150 miles (78,643 miles). At 200k, we'd probably sell it on the open market and pull $12k cash.

Keeping and maintaining a functional older vehicle, even if it gets poor MPG (such as the Pathy / Xterra) is always the fiscally intelligent choice. Marketing and hype don't play nice with math and statistics. It's simply car salesman voodoo and we've been guzzling it for decades.

Buy a different car because you want it, but don't parade it about as a fiscally smart move. When you have the means (which we all do), drive what you WANT and let the talking heads wring their hands over fuel prices to a less-intelligent audience."


Now in this case, the gent likes the Altima anyway and will probably be happy as a pig in slop with an AWD turbo SV model that he can flog the crap out of but still has fuel-legs like Betty Grable. That's a good reason. Fuel isn't.
;)
can you imagine the people out there buying a new Jeep Wrangler 4xe??
i think in either usa or canada it starts at $53,000. or up to $59,999. ...yikes.
before taxes, destination.
One could buy an older Jeep or older suv , like the Xterra you mentioned, and buy your own gas station ...lol.
But often, for those that have the money to spend ( or those that just gotta have it) it might just be the adult version of getting a new toy and can't wait to show it off to your friends.
 

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Got my new 2021 SV AWD in October, have 3000kms on it and loving it!
No issues whatsoever - live just outside Vancouver, have been up to Whistler several times in the snow, and we just got (another) big dump of snow - this thing is great in the snow!

not getting the gripes about the power train, but this is my first time with a CVT as came from a dodge product previously - it’s not a sport sedan, but I never expected it to be, with plenty of power to pass, and drive the mountain highways to Whistler!

tried And tested powertrain in my mind!
Snow pic:
Sky Tire Wheel Cloud Car
 

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Got my new 2021 SV AWD in October, have 3000kms on it and loving it! No issues whatsoever - live just outside Vancouver, have been up to Whistler several times in the snow, and we just got (another) big dump of snow - this thing is great in the snow!

not getting the gripes about the power train, but this is my first time with a CVT as came from a dodge product previously - it’s not a sport sedan, but I never expected it to be, with plenty of power to pass, and drive the mountain highways to Whistler!

tried And tested powertrain in my mind!
Welcome! The QR25 in your ride is ironclad, and for the CVT, just keep that fluid fresh every 50K km and your tranny will probably outlast the rest of the car. Nissan's attitude about transmission maintenance is deplorable (not that they're alone, that's also true of all the other OE's that use CVT's), but it's the one piece of advice in the Owner's Manual you should ignore. You might also consider getting an ELM327 adaptor and downloading a copy of CVTz50 to your phone so you can peek at the CVT temperature before and after service. That's important because everyone in the car biz is hard-up for qualified technicians right now, and I've heard too many recent instances of unqualified dealership people over-filling CVT's on changes. That's death for a CVT, it foams the fluid and makes hot-spots that quickly ravage the belt. Having CVTz50 on your phone to monitor the drive home will assure that doesn't happen to you, the elevated temperature will clue you immediately that somebody screwed up. It will also clue you if your mountain drives to Whistler are heating up the CVT and maybe you should add a trans cooler. None of this is specific Rogue advice, it's generic to all Nissan CVT's, but make a separate thread if you like and we can tell you all about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Got my new 2021 SV AWD in October, have 3000kms on it and loving it!
No issues whatsoever - live just outside Vancouver, have been up to Whistler several times in the snow, and we just got (another) big dump of snow - this thing is great in the snow!

not getting the gripes about the power train, but this is my first time with a CVT as came from a dodge product previously - it’s not a sport sedan, but I never expected it to be, with plenty of power to pass, and drive the mountain highways to Whistler!

tried And tested powertrain in my mind!
Snow pic:
View attachment 8054
cool, congrats on your new Rogue. It's a a good looking suv.
I live in Vancouver and boy, did we ever get walloped with a dump of snow. With what was previously on the ground, must be about 7-8 inches combined ( for those of you snickering, that is considered a lot for Vancouver. Horrible drivers combined with many driving with balding All Season tires + red/yellow light runners and many without any previous winter driving experience = Disaster.)
Took the 04 Matrix out with 4 snow tires and once i drove away from the mountain of snow that the snow plows dumped up against my car, it was a breeze on the main streets. Mind you, i took it slow, no sudden braking or turning, streets and parking lots. were still slushy. Took my younger neighbor with me to get him some groceries for his young family . He moved here from INdia three years ago and tells me he has zero experience with winter/snow driving. I gave him a few tips and suggested he go take his Mazda6 out for some winter driving adventures, but alas...he only has M&S rated all seasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Welcome! The QR25 in your ride is ironclad, and for the CVT, just keep that fluid fresh every 50K km and your tranny will probably outlast the rest of the car. Nissan's attitude about transmission maintenance is deplorable (not that they're alone, that's also true of all the other OE's that use CVT's), but it's the one piece of advice in the Owner's Manual you should ignore. You might also consider getting an ELM327 adaptor and downloading a copy of CVTz50 to your phone so you can peek at the CVT temperature before and after service. That's important because everyone in the car biz is hard-up for qualified technicians right now, and I've heard too many recent instances of unqualified dealership people over-filling CVT's on changes. That's death for a CVT, it foams the fluid and makes hot-spots that quickly ravage the belt. Having CVTz50 on your phone to monitor the drive home will assure that doesn't happen to you, the elevated temperature will clue you immediately that somebody screwed up. It will also clue you if your mountain drives to Whistler are heating up the CVT and maybe you should add a trans cooler. None of this is specific Rogue advice, it's generic to all Nissan CVT's, but make a separate thread if you like and we can tell you all about it.
Should he just go and get the tranny cooler installed and maybe have peace of mind? are these coolers + labor install rates expensive?
 

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Should he just go and get the tranny cooler installed and maybe have peace of mind? are these coolers + labor install rates expensive?
That's an option, but for warranty purposes it would need to be installed with an internal or external H-valve (thermostatic bypass) to prevent over-cooling. Dana/Tru-Cool makes some nice ones with the valve contained in the cooler for easier installation. Labor rates will vary, I'd say it's a 2 hour job for an internal-valve type on a lift with proper tools, 3~4 if it's done in a driveway with hand tools. Coolers aren't really necessary as long as the car's cooling system is healthy, because the exchanger in the radiator is very efficient. What a cooler will do is protect the CVT if the cooling system has a problem or during extreme conditions like a hot-day hill-climb where the cooling system is pushed near its limits. Frequent steep climbing is also very hard on the fluid because of increased shear load, so religious fluid changes are a must under those circumstances.
 

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Welcome! The QR25 in your ride is ironclad, and for the CVT, just keep that fluid fresh every 50K km and your tranny will probably outlast the rest of the car. Nissan's attitude about transmission maintenance is deplorable (not that they're alone, that's also true of all the other OE's that use CVT's), but it's the one piece of advice in the Owner's Manual you should ignore. You might also consider getting an ELM327 adaptor and downloading a copy of CVTz50 to your phone so you can peek at the CVT temperature before and after service. That's important because everyone in the car biz is hard-up for qualified technicians right now, and I've heard too many recent instances of unqualified dealership people over-filling CVT's on changes. That's death for a CVT, it foams the fluid and makes hot-spots that quickly ravage the belt. Having CVTz50 on your phone to monitor the drive home will assure that doesn't happen to you, the elevated temperature will clue you immediately that somebody screwed up. It will also clue you if your mountain drives to Whistler are heating up the CVT and maybe you should add a trans cooler. None of this is specific Rogue advice, it's generic to all Nissan CVT's, but make a separate thread if you like and we can tell you all about it.
so is the CVT fluid change strictly a distance thing (50,000kms), or is there a “time” factor in there…..I’ll probably only do 12,000kms a yr, maybe 14 tops, so minimum 4yrs before I hit 50k…..

?
 

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No, the primary component in CVT fluid is mineral oil just like conventional ATF, so there's no time factor. Mineral oil doesn't oxidize much except at high temperatures. The three wear-and-tear factors that affect it are leadfoot driving habits, lots of steep hills, or any sort of trailering (even very lightweight). Any of those will call for more frequent changes. The wife and I are both leadfooters, so I change our '13 Altie's fluid at 20~25K miles (say, 35~40K km).

It's not hard to understand why the fluid is so critical if you consider how a CVT works. You have a metal belt riding on a pair of metal pulleys, with no ablative clutch material like a conventional A/T. The quality of the fluid is the only thing keeping metal off metal, so if you let the fluid break down, so will your tranny. In that sense the fluid is the CVT's great weakness, but the lack of clutches to wear out is also its great strength. With religious fluid changes they're perpetual motion machines, because there's almost nothing to wear out. We have one old Murano at our shop that's pushing almost 500K on the original CVT. It's been everyplace from Anchorage to Miami without so much as a hiccup, but the owner fastidiously changes the fluid at or before 30K miles. It's on its second engine and the rest of the car is starting to fall apart around the drivetrain, so at this point I'm confident in saying the CVT will outlive the car.
 

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No, the primary component in CVT fluid is mineral oil just like conventional ATF, so there's no time factor. Mineral oil doesn't oxidize much except at high temperatures. The three wear-and-tear factors that affect it are leadfoot driving habits, lots of steep hills, or any sort of trailering (even very lightweight). Any of those will call for more frequent changes. The wife and I are both leadfooters, so I change our '13 Altie's fluid at 20~25K miles (say, 35~40K km).

It's not hard to understand why the fluid is so critical if you consider how a CVT works. You have a metal belt riding on a pair of metal pulleys, with no ablative clutch material like a conventional A/T. The quality of the fluid is the only thing keeping metal off metal, so if you let the fluid break down, so will your tranny. In that sense the fluid is the CVT's great weakness, but the lack of clutches to wear out is also its great strength. With religious fluid changes they're perpetual motion machines, because there's almost nothing to wear out. We have one old Murano at our shop that's pushing almost 500K on the original CVT. It's been everyplace from Anchorage to Miami without so much as a hiccup, but the owner fastidiously changes the fluid at or before 30K miles. It's on its second engine and the rest of the car is starting to fall apart around the drivetrain, so at this point I'm confident in saying the CVT will outlive the car.
Thanks man, really appreciate the (very obvious) expertise!

my daughter got herself a 2021 Qashqai SV, and I was so impressed with its level of fit and finish, plus the tech, that when my 2011 Dodge Grand Caravan died, i new Nissan was for me…

I checked out the RAV 4, but that drove and sounded like a tractor, and the best model (the Prime) is stupid expensive…..the Honda CR-V is ooooollllddddddd…….the Mazda CX-5 is expensive for a slightly jacked sedan, and pretty darn small…..

So Nissan……I tried the Murano, but for another $10k over a Rogue if really didn’t do anything more, and the gas mileage is not great (I have gotten 6.3L per 100km, about 37mpg on the highway at 105kph)
Dog Snow Dog breed Carnivore Collar

…….the 2022 Pathfinder is to big for our current needs, with the kids grown, it’s just us and the dog!

so Rogue SV AWD, full load except leather (big dog - pic above), and no power trunk……

Kilo girl!
 

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You're most welcome, happy to help. Yep, the Qashqais were great rides from the get-go. Virtually zero teething problems here in the US because most of the systems were co-opted or borrowed wholesale from the gen2 Rogue. I expect it will borrow heavily from the gen3 when the remake arrives in '23. Your daughter's Qash will have a CVT too, so the same stuff I mentioned above will apply equally to her ride.

Happy New Year all!
 
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