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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have DTC P0335 and I wonder if you have to reprogram or relearn something after changing the CKP sensor? The car is a 2001 Nissan Almera. I have bought an aftermarket sensor and put it in, but I still have the same problem. P0335 keeps coming back and car hesitates under load from idle to about 3000 rpm. The tachometer fluctuates a couple of hundred rpm in the same range.

I have checked/measured wiring according to factory service manual and they seem fine.

The car runs fine apart from this and I have no other DTCs.

Advice is greatly wanted :)

/Sweden
 

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NF Mod/Nissan Master Tech
2006 Pathfinder LE, 2003 Frontier SVE
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10,667 Posts
No, just replace the sensor and erase the code. It's best to stick with genuine Nissan or OE sensors, like Denso, Hitachi or NTK; I've run into several aftermarket sensors that were bad right out of the box, so, maybe you got a bad part?
 

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Just like SMJ said, when replacing sensors, always use Nissan OEM parts from a Nissan dealer; aftermarket electronic items generally are not reliable, don't last long, and many times are DOA. The sensors are not very expensive; around $75. Inspect the harness connectors at all the sensors for any oxidation or loose connections. Insure that any water resistant connector is in good condition; if the seals have been compromised, then any water intrusion can cause intermittent problems.

If you install an aftermarket sensor and it sounds like it's still acting up with a long cranking of the starter (with no codes or a crank sensor code) is usually a sign of a sensor with insufficient reluctance, which doesn't trigger properly at cranking speed but does once the car fires and the reluctor wheel spins faster. It's common for cheap aftermarket CKP's and CMP's to misbehave that way.

A common problem with random engine shutdowns, difficult startups, rough running is a marginal camshaft position sensor or a marginal crankshaft position sensor. The best and cheapest fix for this situation is to replace both sensors at the same time; the reason for doing this is there is no way to determine which sensor is at fault with this type of condition. You can take your vehicle to a dealer/repair shop and they'll tell you there is nothing wrong after they go through with diagnostic tests because at that time the vehicle was running OK. You could end up spending $200 or much more depending on how much time/parts are used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So time to update you on my findings and progress!

Replaced the new Meat&Doria sensor with the new expensive "Nissan" sensor a couple of weeks ago. I replaced the old camshaft position sensor with the Meat&Doria one. Unfortunately there was no luck and the car behaived the same as before.

I managed to determine that the "Nissan" sensor I recieved actually was a Hitachi unit and managed to find another one online for half of the "Nissan" price.

Got the sensor today and fitted it at the camshaft position and erased the DTC and voila :) The car is now my friend again and runs like new despite of 184000 kilometers on the odometer.

I can mention that the Nissan/Hitachi sensors have grey plastics and a cylindric metallic sensor body unlike the black plastic Meat&Doria that has a rektangular plasticy sensor body. I will try to upload som pictures for reference.

Thank's for your advice to replace both sensors with OEM units before doing anything else!
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NF Mod/Nissan Master Tech
2006 Pathfinder LE, 2003 Frontier SVE
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10,667 Posts
The original Nissan sensors were the plastic type, but they later updated them to the metal type like you now have. Genuine Nissan, NTK, Denso and Hitachi are all good brands to go with as they all make OE sensors for Nissan.
 
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