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Does anyone know who designed the RB26DETT? I am doing a report on a designer that has changed the world and i picked this guy or team of people. I need to know where to get some info on the guy/team.

Also if you know a better/easier topic lemme know.
 

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how about do a report on the evolution of engines. It would be alot of work, but just think about how many things there are to analyze.

henry fords first v8
turbos and superchargers and their impact on WWII
fuel injection
the future of hybrids and such.

HUUUUUGE topic. Otherwise, goodluck on the RB26dett, it wont be easy.
 

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yea thats the best topic cuz the evolution of the engine would be more related to something that has changed the world; the only thing the RB has changed is motor enthusiast, but the evolution of the engine would be perfect; because you can talk about how we have went from manual cranking too electronic ignition and forced induction and stuff like that; if you get your facts right you should have many people intrested and you should get above an 89
 

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STARBUCKS said:
Does anyone know who designed the RB26DETT? I am doing a report on a designer that has changed the world and i picked this guy or team of people. I need to know where to get some info on the guy/team.

Also if you know a better/easier topic lemme know.
The RB26 was not designed, I think it just evolved from other RB engines....

Well here goes.....

The RB engines are decended from the 6 Cylinder L serries of Nissan engines, thats why they retain the cast iron block, alloy head and overhead cam. Major changes compared to the L engines are a Corssflow head, and a completely diffrent EFI system designed by JECS which is similar to the J Jetronic system (JECS is a division of bosch)

The next part in the story of the RB is what not many people know about. In 1984 a Australian car company, Holden (owned my GM :( ) needed a Unleaded powerplant for its 5th Generation Commodore due to the fact that the new ADR's required all new cars built after 1 Jan 1986 to run on unleaded fuel. Holden had trouble converting its Australian designed HEC 202 L6 engine (used in the 4th Gen modelthe VK) to unleaded fuel, so they sent teams overseas to investigate various car companys that could design and produce a stopgap engine that ran on unleaded fuel. However most companys were very reluctant to build them a engine, of the size they wanted (3 Litres plus ), produce the power they wanted (Torque) and to survive Australian conditions.

After trying companys like Toyota, Jaguar etc, Nissan was the only company that took up the job. Holden sent engineers over to Japan, to supervise the design and building of the prototype engines. The Nissan engineers produced a power plant which met all of Holdens design guidelines, except weight. However the weight was only a few Kg's over was Holden had specified, so this was ignored.

The Engine they produced, the RB30E produced 114Kw @ 5200rpm of power and 296nm of torque at 3300rpm. Also produced for export use, was the RB20E. Due to a smaller bore and stroke of this engine it only produced 97kw @ 6800rpm and 172nm @ 4400rpm....

The other engine that Nissan produced for Holden (and Holden only!) was the RB30ET. This engine was put into the infamous VL Turbo.....:cool:

So by the time the VL Commodore went into production in 1985 (5th Gen) Holden had its stopgap powerplant.

So while the VL was on sale, Holden's engine arm (HEC) went into action, designing a engine that could be produced in Australia....they eventually produced a V6 engine that was a knock off of a Buick V8 with two cylinders chopped off.....This engine was standard equipment in the new VN Commodore (6th Gen) in 1988....However this is a story floating around that Holden wanted to use a larger version of the RB30E, RB33 or RB36 for their new VN Commodore, but Nissan didn't want to produce a larger RB engine....I wonder why?

Running paralel to the RB Engine development for Holden, Nissan own RB devlopment moved ahead. In 1985 the R31 Skyline went into production in Japan. This car started out with a Twin Cam RB20. A turbo version was also offered. Due to the fact that the RB30E was a Australia/New Zealand only engine, Australian Made R31 Skylines came with the RB30E (Not the RB30ET). However the R31 lost in the sales race due to poor styleing.....Still I think they look nice :) Maybe thats why Nissan didn't want to build a engine for the next model Commodore? Because a car with the same engine and gearbox as their car kicked its arse?

There are stories on how the Skyline R32 GTR came into being, however I won't go into that. This next part of the story is from a Australian point of view.

I think the RB26DETT came into being as a hybrid, useing the same bore size of a RB30E, less stroke (thats why its 2.6litres not 3!), a twin cam head ala RB20DET and two turbochargers. Earlier Skylines/Nissan race cars, were considered very laggy. The DR30 Skyline with its FJ20 Turbo powerplant was said to be a all or nothing turbo engine, While the HR31 GTS-R with its RB20DET powerplant was an improvment, but still very laggy. Remeber there is only so far you can go on 2L....

So by the time the new R32 GTR came into being Nissan answered the calls of race car drivers and added two small turbo chargers in place of one big one for improved spool up time and a larger capacity for more power down low in the rev range. However some race cars drivers like Mark Gibbs who drove GTR's in the late 80's early 90's beofre they got their reputation still complained of lag.....oh well! :rolleyes:
 
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