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You should be able to have enopugh access for one of the two most common types of wrenches: End-cap & strap.

If you see examples of each of these designs, as well as your application, you should be able to figure out which one will work best for you. Try:

http://www.lislecorp.com/tool_browse_list.cfm?browse=9

The screwdriver trick can work ... but it should only be used once the canister is deformed. Often the screwdriver will tear through a filter and remove chunks of it but the baseplate remains stuck against the gasket-mating surface. Then, you need to take pliers such as vicegrips to try and get the jagged baseplate to spin off.

Best to use the proper tool, instead. And when installing the filter, as tight as you can get it by hand should suffice.
 

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Hey all you screwdriver fans, have you tried your Sir Lancelot trick with a chinsey-ass filter like a Fram?

Some of the better filters with thicker canisters might hold up OK but I remember one afternoon with a ******* buddy who had no proper wrench, was unable to get it off by hand, had pierced the (Fram) filter with a screwdriver and had managed to carve off most of the whole filter.

For that, he ended up using a pair of water pump pliers to grip the jagged metal and try to get the remainder to turn. He ended up ripping most of jagged metal off the baseplate ... but eventually got that off too.

The job which should have taken 15 minutes took well over an hour. :rolleyes:

Then what does he do? Puts the new filter (pretty sure it was a Fram) on as tight as he could by hand. :rolleyes:

In short, if you think you're gonna have the car for at least a couple of years, invest the $5-8 in a good wrench. Hard to beat any of those made by Lisle.
 

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"The best removal tools are a chain loop with a boss on them to fasten to a socket bar."

These types of set-ups work well and have the added ability of being adjustable.

However, if you get an end-cap tool that fits your filter perfectly, thos are pretty tough to beat. Their problem is that they require a close fit and you need quite a collection of them to do a fleet of different vehicles. ;)

"Put a film of grease on the rubber seal of the new filter to aid removing next time."

:eek:

Most filter manufacturers specifically say to not use grease ... but to use the thin film of motor oil on the gasket as well as being sure to clean off the gasket-mating surface.
 
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