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Hey y’all,

I’ve been thinking about this for a while now and I can’t wrap my head around whether it’s a conspiracy theory or if there’s actual merit in contemplating this question. When thinking about what Nissan (or car in general) to buy, I find myself always debating the cost of getting a new car, driving it until it’s out of warranty, and then trading it in, or buying a well-maintained older car and then fixing it up to run the way I want to. Almost everybody I know tries to persuade me of the former, but I have serious doubts. And here’s why.

I can’t escape the feeling that consumerism has seeped into every pore of modern society. From smartphones and electronics to smart homes and even cars, everything nowadays is built to last a certain period, after which you’re supposed to throw it out and get a replacement device. When I was growing up, my dad used to drive a ‘68 Charger and that thing still runs better today than most new cars (not to mention it’s way cooler). I need a daily workhorse for other needs, but I don’t want to be wasting money carelessly. Hence, my original question.

The only thing I don’t see changed are vices that prey on people from every corner. Drugs, cigarettes, pornography, sugar, and many other types of addictions are here and more potent than ever. Just the other day my kids were visiting for the holidays and my son started talking about how he made a killing playing some slot game online. He’s 18 and already gambling, which blew my mind. He sent me the link (5 Best Slots with Jewels and Gems Theme) asking if we’d play together, but I have no intention of doing that.

Sorry for the long post/rant, but I can’t be the only one slightly disappointed by the world we live in today. I think I’ll stick with an older Nissan for now.
 

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91 Sentra E
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Hey y’all,

I’ve been thinking about this for a while now and I can’t wrap my head around whether it’s a conspiracy theory or if there’s actual merit in contemplating this question. When thinking about what Nissan (or car in general) to buy, I find myself always debating the cost of getting a new car, driving it until it’s out of warranty, and then trading it in, or buying a well-maintained older car and then fixing it up to run the way I want to. Almost everybody I know tries to persuade me of the former, but I have serious doubts. And here’s why.

I can’t escape the feeling that consumerism has seeped into every pore of modern society. From smartphones and electronics to smart homes and even cars, everything nowadays is built to last a certain period, after which you’re supposed to throw it out and get a replacement device. When I was growing up, my dad used to drive a ‘68 Charger and that thing still runs better today than most new cars (not to mention it’s way cooler). I need a daily workhorse for other needs, but I don’t want to be wasting money carelessly. Hence, my original question.

The only thing I don’t see changed are vices that prey on people from every corner. Drugs, cigarettes, pornography, sugar, and many other types of addictions are here and more potent than ever. Just the other day my kids were visiting for the holidays and my son started talking about how he made a killing playing some slot game online. He’s 18 and already gambling, which blew my mind. He sent me the link (5 Best Slots with Jewels and Gems Theme) asking if we’d play together, but I have no intention of doing that.

Sorry for the long post/rant, but I can’t be the only one slightly disappointed by the world we live in today. I think I’ll stick with an older Nissan for now.
I understand your point. I think part of what factors into decisions nowadays to buy new or repair or buy used has to do with very high repair costs. If I was not able to do most of my own work I would probably buy myself a new car. I currently have a 2015 Rogue with 90K miles, a 2001 Altima with 60K (not a misprint) and a 1991 Sentra with 213K with a 4 speed manual transmission. Guess which I enjoy the most? It’s the ‘91 Sentra for its dependability and simplicity. I’m sure I will be driving the old Altima and Sentra long after the newer Rogue is gone.
 

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From the purview of an electrical specialist, the thing that bothers me most is the shrinking copper conductor sizes and profusion of low-voltage digital signals in modern stuff. There's no denying that 1991 production tolerances were far better than 1968, and today's are far better than 1991, so from a mechanical standpoint I'll take a modern conveyance hands-down. However, from the standpoint of long-term reliability overall, everything from around '10 up will start to have intractable electrical gremlins as they age, and the newer the car, the more intractable those gremlins will eventually be. More signals running through thinner copper under increasing silicon control guarantees it. I'm frankly glad I'm nearing retirement age, because in 15 or 20 years, many of the latest generation of cars will need a ghostbuster and not an electrician. It won't be pretty, and I'm very glad I won't need to deal with it.
 

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Hey y’all,

I’ve been thinking about this for a while now and I can’t wrap my head around whether it’s a conspiracy theory or if there’s actual merit in contemplating this question. When thinking about what Nissan (or car in general) to buy, I find myself always debating the cost of getting a new car, driving it until it’s out of warranty, and then trading it in, or buying a well-maintained older car and then fixing it up to run the way I want to. Almost everybody I know tries to persuade me of the former, but I have serious doubts. And here’s why.

I can’t escape the feeling that consumerism has seeped into every pore of modern society. From smartphones and electronics to smart homes and even cars, everything nowadays is built to last a certain period, after which you’re supposed to throw it out and get a replacement device. When I was growing up, my dad used to drive a ‘68 Charger and that thing still runs better today than most new cars (not to mention it’s way cooler). I need a daily workhorse for other needs, but I don’t want to be wasting money carelessly. Hence, my original question.

The only thing I don’t see changed are vices that prey on people from every corner. Drugs, cigarettes, pornography, sugar, and many other types of addictions are here and more potent than ever. Just the other day my kids were visiting for the holidays and my son started talking about how he made a killing playing some slot game online. He’s 18 and already gambling, which blew my mind. He sent me the link (5 Best Slots with Jewels and Gems Theme) asking if we’d play together, but I have no intention of doing that.

Sorry for the long post/rant, but I can’t be the only one slightly disappointed by the world we live in today. I think I’ll stick with an older Nissan for now.
The issue for me about cars built in the last few years, and increasingly so, are the number of so-called "computer modules" in these vehicles. I don't know the current "record" number in any particular vehicle but 10 to 15 modules I think is pretty much standard and I bet there are some vehicles with more than that. Many of those modules are critical just to start and drive the car so failure of one of those critical ones turns your wonderful, hi-tech vehicle into a boat anchor. Of course the 'repair' for such problems is replacing the module, and some are quite pricey. It would be one thing if there were actually people trained and available to actually repair these modules but of course as with many gadgets that we buy parts (or the whole item) are throwaway. Now I realize that really smart ECMs/ECUs or TCMs, etc. can make engines and vehicles perform far better than older cars but I predict a new trend soon where cars will be sent to salvage yards simply because the cost of replacing one or more modules is deemed too expensive. I have already had personal experience a few years ago with these issues with my 2008 Dodge [Mercedes] Sprinter van (bought used in 2014), when it died because of what I realized was an ECM failure. The replacement (new) ECU ran about $3,000 Canadian and I was very reluctant to spend that. I realized as I bought used ECMs from salvage yards that Sprinters of that vintage were usually being towed to junk yards because of failed ECMs. I have electronics experience and gear so I decided to take my ECU (and the dead ones I unfortunately bought) apart and try to diagnose the problem. In the end I was able to identify the bad component, a transistor that cost me about $12, and get the ECM back to perfect condition.
 

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Valid Topic for sure....

Being over 60 & being a mechanic of all types most my life I say without reservation that going AS OLD as you can & paying the extra for something in MINT SHAPE you will be money ahead...

Sourcing parts is another thing locating a wreck or two to keep for parts is smart...

The present state of auto tech is putrid...Back in the day you could buy a group 24 battery & would fit many dozens of vehicles for a 20 dollar bill...Now it's a 'special' group that costs 150-200 bucks...You could also back then go into ANY auto parts store & buy a new tail lense for your ford-chevy-mopar whatever for 5-10 bucks...NOW muck yours up for a $200-400 dollar bill...

Not by chance you see it's all engineered to be MORE difficult for you to diagnose & work on & yet...YET!!! There is PLANNED OBSOLESCENCE engineered in it ALL!!

I started out as lube-detail at a Toyota Dealership in 1979 & man has it all gone beyond thunderdome...

But...BUTT!!...Don't get too worked up...Those in power plan on switching from gas to electric by 2030. They will make it sound good but fact is that nobody...NOBODY! will ever own the battery, you will have to lease it...And if you don't pay they will shut it down remotely...So you just buy the CAR WITHOUT the battery so you got TWO payments then. Charging stations will charge plenty & this will limit your travel range as well having to constantly stop to recharge...

On top of this is the emf...THE EMF that the car will put out whilst in operation which will be bathing your 'aura' in electrical death...Much like those walking about with SMART tech glued to their skulls then having to have a large chunk of flesh carved out later on...

People have the notion that 'Newer is Better' ...IT IS NOT!!! I would much rather go back to 1979 with rotary phones still in use, no internet, no SMART tech for dumb people, no spying devices either as nowadays you car is 'listening to you' as you drive about...
 

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Hey y’all,

I’ve been thinking about this for a while now and I can’t wrap my head around whether it’s a conspiracy theory or if there’s actual merit in contemplating this question. When thinking about what Nissan (or car in general) to buy, I find myself always debating the cost of getting a new car, driving it until it’s out of warranty, and then trading it in, or buying a well-maintained older car and then fixing it up to run the way I want to. Almost everybody I know tries to persuade me of the former, but I have serious doubts. And here’s why.

I can’t escape the feeling that consumerism has seeped into every pore of modern society. From smartphones and electronics to smart homes and even cars, everything nowadays is built to last a certain period, after which you’re supposed to throw it out and get a replacement device. When I was growing up, my dad used to drive a ‘68 Charger and that thing still runs better today than most new cars (not to mention it’s way cooler). I need a daily workhorse for other needs, but I don’t want to be wasting money carelessly. Hence, my original question.

The only thing I don’t see changed are vices that prey on people from every corner. Drugs, cigarettes, pornography, sugar, and many other types of addictions are here and more potent than ever. Just the other day my kids were visiting for the holidays and my son started talking about how he made a killing playing some slot game online. He’s 18 and already gambling, which blew my mind. He sent me the link (5 Best Slots with Jewels and Gems Theme) asking if we’d play together, but I have no intention of doing that.

Sorry for the long post/rant, but I can’t be the only one slightly disappointed by the world we live in today. I think I’ll stick with an older Nissan for now.
Thinking about your comments, I pretty much agree. Me being an old fart; back in the day around maybe 50 years ago, life seemed to be a lot simpler. Pride and workmanship was the rule of the land; there was much more respect among your peers. Today it seems we have a high strung society; more lawlessness - lawsuits have become the norm. Look at somebody cross-eyed and they're ready to shoot you. Planned obsolescence has become much more evident in the products we buy.
 

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Thinking about your comments, I pretty much agree. Me being an old fart; back in the day around maybe 50 years ago, life seemed to be a lot simpler. Pride and workmanship was the rule of the land; there was much more respect among your peers. Today it seems we have a high strung society; more lawlessness - lawsuits have become the norm. Look at somebody cross-eyed and they're ready to shoot you. Planned obsolescence has become much more evident in the products we buy.
There was an old SF book from the early '70's by a guy named Mack Reynolds that hit on what's causing much of the problem. His timeframe was all screwed up, but he predicted a coming time when a quarter or less of the population could produce enough goods and services for the whole population. What he got wrong was that the kinds of services people want would explode with technology, but he still won't be wrong in the long run. That day is coming, and -- well -- what to do with the three-quarters who are unemployable?

I digress. Here's the upshot for today: Cars that are designed to be built by robots and not repaired by people. That, my friends, is a one-way street, and the whole world is tooling down it on cruise control. Not just for cars, for everything.
 
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