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· High times
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510Mods said:
Thats truly not a "free piston engine" The pistons should not be connected by any-means to anything. And there is no drive shaft. A free piston motor is like 4 two stroke motors cradling 2 pistons. 1 chamber on each side of piston. Then in the very middle is and exhaust port with a special manifold chamber. But a true free-piston engine has only 2 moving parts. And also has 2 ignition sources, glow plugs for running and spark plugs to initial start. Which the starting is done by feeding it air pressure.
So if there's no drive shaft(you said no crankshaft) then it's of no use to us propel a vehicle????
 

· High times
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the one I posted above drive the propeller of a boat...
 

· Think outside "The Box"
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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
That one you posted is a great idea also with the shaft. Reminds me of Wankel engine alittle bit and a 2 stroke. But I did post up a short explaination on what the free-piston (not piston free) engine is, and how it uses thrust to propel. This is a small definition of what the difference between a normal turbine and this engine. Here's the only reason why they call it a "turbine" motor.

"A turbine blade or impeller does not necessarily have to be metallic. It could be steel, wood, or plastic. In the case of this free-piston engine,the spinning impeller is gaseous, when the powerful gas exhaust reaches the special nozzle, it creates a vortex causing its gases to spin at high speed, which is similar to a modern turbine impeller. Its high-powered thrust is achieved because of the vortex phenomenon of spinning gases."
 

· High times
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I understand the concept... but the ones i've seen looks like it just sits there and hahaha sucks and blows air with absolutely no purpose unless it puts out enough force to propel and object that it is attached to.. I.E.(jet propulsion)
 

· High times
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· Think outside "The Box"
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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
I love the idea of Stirling engines. Thats where the original concepts for steam generators came from. The tried and trued "free-piston motor" is self-sufficient and requires little maintenance. Also for having a gross weight of 42lbs and making 200hp is great. Yes, there is no direct drive to a shaft or motion transfer. Its all thrust produced by tuning sound and pressure waves. It has been installed on a vehicle before, and the thrust it produces can power whatever. check out the pic of it I tried to post up in an earlier post. If anyone can make it a picture instead of an attachment, please do it for me.
 

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· Think outside "The Box"
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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
They call it "LoudMouth".
 

· bitter old man
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♣AsleepZ♣ said:
[regarding oval pistons]........ why?
Valve area. The Honda engines had eight valves per cylinder for valve area and to reduce reciprocating valve mass. Honda abandoned the idea after two Gran Prix racing seasons as more-than-expected development was required to get competitive power.

The gain in low-lift valve area is more than offset by the much large parts count.
 

· Think outside "The Box"
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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
If it was developed more, I can see some advantages that would outweight the dis-. I think what they should be developing and I have been thinking about more. Is independant pistons using their own crankshaft and then they feed into a special transmission to gather the power for the drivetrain. When you see harley twins making 180hp it gets you thinking. If you could assemble an 8 cylinder motor using 4 twin piston engines, that would have a potential of 800 hp. Also there is this Suzuki GS1200 4 cylinder. Custom EFI with twin turbo, all stock bottom end with forged rods, no nitrous. He is getting 760hp from it. He took it to a shop that was having a contest on the best dyno for crotch rockets, and blew them all away. They almost had to kick him off cause they thought he was going to break the machine.
 

· bitter old man
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510Mods said:
I think what they should be developing and I have been thinking about more. Is independant pistons using their own crankshaft and then they feed into a special transmission to gather the power for the drivetrain.
Ariel Square-4 did this. Used two vertical twins and geared the two cranks to one output shaft.
When you see harley twins making 180hp it gets you thinking.
Harley Shmarley. Tractor engines. No Harley will make that power without nitrous. Besides, you need the 1.3-liter engines to get there. The 883 is hopeless.
Also there is this Suzuki GS1200 4 cylinder. Custom EFI with twin turbo, all stock bottom end with forged rods, no nitrous. He is getting 760hp from it. He took it to a shop that was having a contest on the best dyno for crotch rockets, and blew them all away. They almost had to kick him off cause they thought he was going to break the machine.
This year's Daytona Bike Week? MTI holds a horsepower shootout every year. I don;t think my Suzuki Bandit 1200 would tolerate that much oomph without some serious lower-end work.
 

· Think outside "The Box"
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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
I didn't mean a factory v-twin 88. It was an S&S v-twin motor. And the motorcycle did have a stock bottom end. He did recommend that you go all forged if you were to push it past that, cause of oiling issues. I'll find the article and post it. I was suspicious at first, but I call things as I see them. My bs is usually true, but just nobody heard of it b4 or believes me.
 

· bitter old man
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510Mods said:
I didn't mean a factory v-twin 88. It was an S&S v-twin motor.
Different kettle of fish but doesn't smell any better. They're something like 1.5 or 1.8 liter engines. Still an agricultural implement. I have never been able to fathom the fascination with the 45º lumps. The engine in the V-Rod is the first really modern engine from Harley...and it's still a 45º paint shaker.

As for forged, it's a weight/rpm issue, not oiling. Spin one of those to 7,000 and you'll be leaving an ugly trail of shiny, oily parts.
 

· Think outside "The Box"
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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
I meant the oiling issues for the Suzuki GSXR1100 to be exact, I found one of the old posts from GS Resources. This bike was bare stock, except for the turbo.

"GSXR's are tough--Keep the RPM below 11,000, use water injection above 10 psi. Don't put any trick ignitions on them. Run 35 degrees full advance drop you spark gap to.019", use NGK Race plugs, and you can get 272-350 hp. About 18 psi and 272 hp @ 10,000 rpm is enough to do anything. No one believes us but we do not recommend boring the motors, big blocks or Carillo rods. If you over-rev them past the stock redline you will sooner or later crack the crankshaft. Stay with Suzuki's internal balance factors, they did a better job than you will. These are violent, sudden toys that get your attention fast...and will get you if you don't pay attention."

The one that I originally was talking about I remember was a stock xr1200, retro fit twin turbo, shaved pistons, water-air intercooled, EFI, water injection, and it had an MSD ignition. I love turbo's, free power.
 

· bitter old man
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510Mods said:
I meant the oiling issues for the Suzuki GSXR1100
Oh. The Bandit 1200 is based on the GSXR1100. Everybody who races them adds a top-end oiling kit. I'm not sure about the big-block but the 600s have a problem with prolonged wheelies causing #3 bearing to fail...

The one that I originally was talking about I remember was a stock xr1200...
Bleah, turbo or not, a marginal engine at best.
 

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Ride116 said:
I think they were only used in motorcycle applications because there was only 1 (maybe 2?) pistons.
Yes Honda did this for Racing Motorcycle engines.
I believe they abandoned the idea when they did not get any advantages. From what i remember they postulated that the friction on the thrust side could be lowered and thus produce more power. Don't remember which way they put the oval, long direction in line with the connecting rod circle I believe. Yes as previously pointed out they also claimed more valve area.
BTW the "free-piston engine" type twin acting piston design is in your old A6 GM A/C compressor. Took more than one of those apart........
 

· Think outside "The Box"
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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
400 hp from a small stock motor like that in a bike is pretty amazing to me. How bout ball pistons?
 
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