Nissan Forum banner

1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So i want to turbo charge my 1984 nissan 720 with the 2.4 z24 everything on it is stock i wanted to know if i had to put new head studs or if i can run it on stock internals
 

·
Sup Mod keeping the peace
Joined
·
7,368 Posts
So i want to turbo charge my 1984 nissan 720 with the 2.4 z24 everything on it is stock i wanted to know if i had to put new head studs or if i can run it on stock internals
First determine the condition of your engine to see if it's tight enough to be able to take the higher boost pressures. One of the best tools for determining engine condition is leak-down testing. A leak down or "cylinder leakage" test is similar to a compression test in that it tells you how well your engine's cylinders are sealing. But instead of measuring pressure, it measures pressure loss. An engine in great condition should generally show only 5 to 10% leakage. An engine that's still in pretty good condition may show up to 20% leakage. But more than 30% leakage indicates trouble. Other considerations:

  • - Is it burning oil. A leak-down test should verify ring conditions.
  • - What are the compression specs on all cylinders.
  • - What is the oil pressure spec. Very important.
You can run the engine on stock internals as long as the boost pressure setting is kept below 8 psi.

Fuel management is the most important and also the most complex item with turbo charging. There are several ways to perform fuel management:

Management options are diverse. The cheapest option is the Rising Rate Fuel Pressure Regulator which automatically adjusts the fuel pressure according to the boost pressure; this is the most affordable way to provide the proper amount of fuel to a turbocharged engine, but are not the best. Digital options are the next step up, which include SAFC-II, AFR, and E-Manage. These are not terribly expensive, and provide the best fuel management for the money. These units digitally manage fuel flow, and provide excellent variability for the money. The next option is a chipped ECU. Jim Wolf Technology is the most famous provider of this service, but these are quite expensive and not user-reprogrammable. The best option is, of couse, stand alone fuel management. Stand alone is a complete ECU replacement. Companies such as AEM sell their EMS units which provide exactly what the name promises, All Engine Management. Stand alone is quite expensive, but can support extremely high horsepower applications while providing the greatest level of tuning flexibility.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top