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I would like to do a brake job on my '03 Sentra SE-R, but have been unable to find instructions or FSM information. I've seen threads that discuss the pad and rotor choices for the car, which have been very informative. I also have friends who are quite experienced with brake jobs on a variety of cars who will be helping me.

I checked the sticky's and didn't see anything, so sorry if I missed something obvious. Any information or suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Grant
 

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Tis pretty easy:

unbolt the wheels.

of course the car is on stands ;)

to change the rotor/pads, remove the two bolts holding the caliper on to the steering knuckle. the rotor will now slide off (nope, don't have to remove the axle bolt).

if the rotor doesn't slide easily, use a 2x4 piece and a hammer and hammer it off from the inside of the wheel well (back side of the rotor) and it should pop right off.

also, use the old pads to press the piston in, then put the new pads in :)
 

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gs_austin said:
I would like to do a brake job on my '03 Sentra SE-R, but have been unable to find instructions or FSM information. I've seen threads that discuss the pad and rotor choices for the car, which have been very informative. I also have friends who are quite experienced with brake jobs on a variety of cars who will be helping me.

I checked the sticky's and didn't see anything, so sorry if I missed something obvious. Any information or suggestions will be greatly appreciated.

Grant
I just replced mine on the 03. I used OEM brembo rotors (high quality) and PBR metal Master pads. Old name AXXIS, Repco. They bite great and don't fade easy.
Chris 92 03 classic
 

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I used to work at a Nissan Dealership and the proceedure is no different then another other car to be quite honest. I'll walk you through a quality brake job though.

1:Remove your wheels with either a 3/4" or 21mm socket (I'm pretty sure on those Spec-V's)
2:On the back of the brake caliper, there will be 2 bolts holding the caliper onto the steering knuckle. To identify which bolts there are, there will be rubber boots on them because these bolts are also caliper slide pins.
3:Remove the caliper. If it's hard coming off, either use a screwdriver to pry it off (It will come off easy, but that way isn't recommended) OR open the bleeder screw on the top of the caliper or side and compress the piston with a screw driver. It will slide in by itself BUT attach a rubber hose to the bleeder screw or else you'll have brake fluid everywhere.
4:Remove old pads from caliper bracket.
5:There will be 2 bolts at the back holding the caliper bracket to the steering knuckle. Remove those bolts.
6:Once that piece is off, the rotor should pull right off. If not, screw 1 lug nut and hit the rotor from the back.
7:Get your new rotors. Take brake clean and WASH THE NEW ROTORS OFF! They are covered in oil to stop rusting while on the shelf. If you don't wash it off, well, your basically lubricating a friction surface and you'll ruin your pads.
8:Before installing the new rotor, there will be little metal clips in the caliper bracket, remove those and use sand paper to clean these little guys up. It will help your pads slid side to side with the rotor and will acually last longer.
9:Instal new rotor and re-install the caliper bracket back on (It the exact opposite of disassembly)
10:Install your new brake pads. What I do, if you have one at home, I take the pads to the brench grinder and carefully take a little bit off the edge of the pad all the way around and it will stop squeeling that may come alittle later on after new brakes (It will go away, but it's annoying)
11:If your car has ABS, OPEN THE BLEEDER SCREW, get an old pad put it on the piston of the caliper then get channel lock pliers and push the piston back in the caliper to accomodate the new pads. Or there is a tool for this. A caliper piston retractor tool. But for 1, make sure you use an old pad and don't push directly on the piston. You can acually crack it or even crumble it. For 2, MAKE SURE you open the bleeder screw while doing this. If not, you'll push old, dirty, fluid back up into your ABS module and plug the valves up. A new one of those is $1000+. Then close the bleeder screw after piston is in the caliper.
12:Re-install the caliper
13:Take a lube called "Copper Kote" or some "Dialectic grease" (NOT dialECTRIC) There is a difference. On is for brakes, the other is for electrical systems. Now grease up the pins that holding the caliper to the caliper bracket.
14:Bleed brakes.

It's strongly recommend that if you don't know what your doing, you take it somewhere to get it done. But otherwise, good luck and have fun :thumbup:
 

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My car just hit the 30,000 mile mark. I think I checked when I put my snows on in December ... but I don't believe my pads were close to worn out yet.

You guys replacing your pads ... how many miles on your ride? Any of you race? :confused:

I used to sell Mintex Silverline ... almost the same as Repco Metal Master (same parent company).

I was thinking about Hawk Ceramic pads when I finally have to replace mine.
 

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Bror Jace said:
My car just hit the 30,000 mile mark. I think I checked when I put my snows on in December ... but I don't believe my pads were close to worn out yet.

You guys replacing your pads ... how many miles on your ride? Any of you race? :confused:

I used to sell Mintex Silverline ... almost the same as Repco Metal Master (same parent company).

I was thinking about Hawk Ceramic pads when I finally have to replace mine.
The OE pads on our cars last an exceptionally long time. I ganked mine at around 22k miles and they are literally in new condition. As for you manual guys, I would imagine how you slow (neutral or downshifting) will affect the wear. At the rate my pads were wearing, they probably would have lasted over 70k miles. The Hawk Ceramics (HPS IIRC) are good, I have the Carbotech Bobcat 1521s (along with Motul RBF and Goodrich SS lines) and I am exceptionally satisfied, Ferodo and Wilwood have an excellent name too, although I do not know if they make a pad for our OE rotors. I have also heard good things about the Axxis Ultimates in terms performance, but not as far as it being a very street friendly pad.
 

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Bror Jace said:
My car just hit the 30,000 mile mark. I think I checked when I put my snows on in December ... but I don't believe my pads were close to worn out yet.

You guys replacing your pads ... how many miles on your ride? Any of you race? :confused:

I used to sell Mintex Silverline ... almost the same as Repco Metal Master (same parent company).

I was thinking about Hawk Ceramic pads when I finally have to replace mine.
The Hawk HPS's last a while but the pedal feel is different from a lot of other cars. Some people don't like them because they require a lot of initial pedal pressure. Other people love that because this makes stops on the street smooth and seamless.

If you get the chance, find someone running HPS's and see they'll let you drive their car before you go and buy them. This way, you won't end up spending money on a pad you might not like.
 

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NickZac, that's good to know. The OEM pads on my Civic would have lasted well past the 100,000 mile mark but I swapped them out at around 90,000.

ReVerm: "The Hawk HPS's last a while but the pedal feel is different from a lot of other cars. Some people don't like them because they require a lot of initial pedal pressure. Other people love that because this makes stops on the street smooth and seamless.

If you get the chance, find someone running HPS's and see they'll let you drive their car before you go and buy them. This way, you won't end up spending money on a pad you might not like."


Thanks, I like a firmer pedal with more initial bite ... but have no intention of racing ... even Solo II.

I haven't really hooked up with any other local gearheads running SpecVs so I'll be playing poke-'n-hope with brake pad choices when the time comes ... which may be a while as I went from putting about 17,000 miles per year on my car down to about 7,000 because I switched jobs and now take a park-'n-ride most of the way into work.

With the way the brake industry is, brands may be different by the time I actually swap my pads. I'm glad the job is fairly straighforward. :)
 

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Have you done stainless steel lines yet? The pedal becomes much firmer, especially with a good Dot 5.1.
 
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