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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi


When I moved to NY with my wife who is from here we purchased a used '99 CR-V, it severed us faithfully until a couple of weeks ago the fuel line began leaking lots of gas... The whole line was rotten and it was duly scrapped. After searching for its replacement we brought a 2016 Nissan Rogue S 85K on the clock and in nice condition, tin wheels and no GPS. As I am sure sometime I will have maintenance questions I signed up!
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Best regards

Robin
 

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Gen2 Rogue engines are just about unkillable, but with 85K, take care of the CVT immediately. Change the fluid right away and do it every 30K if you want it to last. If you DIY it, the one cardinal rule is NEVER OVERFILL. Even a half pint over can quickly kill any CVT. There are plenty of threads in here about how to do it correctly, either by using the leveling plug or replacing exactly what you remove.

They're great cars provided you treat the CVT right. Welcome to Nissan and best of luck with it!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Gen2 Rogue engines are just about unkillable, but with 85K, take care of the CVT immediately. Change the fluid right away and do it every 30K if you want it to last. If you DIY it, the one cardinal rule is NEVER OVERFILL. Even a half pint over can quickly kill any CVT. There are plenty of threads in here about how to do it correctly, either by using the leveling plug or replacing exactly what you remove.

They're great cars provided you treat the CVT right. Welcome to Nissan and best of luck with it!
Thank you, I have done a lot of DIY maintenance I just rebuild my Celica's suspension in 25°F,(see pic), have changed all the fluids in the CR-V and the Celica but the thought of even breathing on the CVT fills me with fear!!!


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How much does the Stealership tend to charge to change the tranny fluid?
Is there an easy way to know if it has been changed recently, a dipstick etc?

Thank you and Best regards,

Robin
 

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Nope, no dipstick. At our dealership you'd be out about $200. But if you're a good DIYer, look through here for how to use the "leveling plug" on the bottom of the trans to get the level right every time. It's really nothing to be afraid of, and AMSoil and Eneos both make excellent fluid that's a lot cheaper than NS3. The only trick is making sure you never overfill, that's death to a CVT. They can run for a long time a quart low, but a quart high will kill one in 1000 miles. Jack it properly and use the leveler, it'll be spot-on every time. :)
 

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Thank you, I have done a lot of DIY maintenance I just rebuild my Celica's suspension in 25°F,(see pic), have changed all the fluids in the CR-V and the Celica but the thought of even breathing on the CVT fills me with fear!!!


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How much does the Stealership tend to charge to change the tranny fluid?
Is there an easy way to know if it has been changed recently, a dipstick etc?

Thank you and Best regards,

Robin
Like VSTAR said, there's no dip stick; you can either use the leveling plug or replacing exactly what you remove. Here's a method I use to change the CVT fluid:
For a simple drain/fill on a 2013 - present, it takes about 4.25 quarts of the NS-3 fluid; There should be a fill tube with a locking cap that you can see from the top of the engine compartment. Pour in only 4 qts. Now make sure to Fully warm up the CVT by driving the car around slowly for about 30 minutes. Now let it idle. Make sure the car is level! Remove the overflow plug from the overflow port that's under the CVT converter case; it's at an angled position. If fluid comes out, let it continue to come out until it stops during the first "hiccup"; now at this point put the plug back on; the CVT is now full. If no fluid comes out, then slowly pour a little of the fluid in until fluid starts coming out of the overflow port. let it continue to come out until it stops during the first "hiccup"; now at this point put the plug back on; the CVT is now full. Now drive it some more for about 15 minutes or more, then recheck the fluid level while it's idling.
 

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Here's a pic of the plug, it's the rusty thing up and left from the guy's hand. The only trick is make sure the car is level, then just yank it with the car warm and running with a drain pan underneath. When the stream "hiccups", you're done, reinsert the plug.

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