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Discussion Starter #1
I have seen threads about people asking about different setups for their E16s as far as carbs go and adding power to their cars. I was wondering if the stock carb provided the best fuel economy or if getting a webber carb instead would help fuel economy as well as performance. Also I'm assuming the emissions gear helps and does not hinder fuel economy as it recycles unburned fuel. If this assumption correct, then is there anything i can do to make sure it works at tip top shape?. I use this car as a daily driver and just want to continue to keep it in its best running shape. Saving a couple extra bucks here and there never hurt either.

Thanks
 

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Viva el iPod
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Many people change their stock EEC (electronically controlled carburetor) system in favor of a Weber because the EEC fails to the point that it is not worth repairing. The fact is that the EEC used on our vehicles is entirely too complicated with many components that can fail. While reliablity is the primary benefit to a weber, I've found I have gained gas mileage, however my results are skewed because my car was not running correctly and usually ran too rich.

A progressive Weber uses a smaller venturi until WOT, when a secondary, larger venturi opens. This setup provides for excellent fuel economy, but also allows for spirited driving.

For me, I get over 300 miles to a tank of crappy California Chevron 87. This is a very rough estimate, but there are (albeit very few) newer four cylinder (EFI) cars that don't get that kind of mileage, so I'd say its pretty economic.


If you are thinking about swapping out your carburetor, you have to consider a few things:

1. A Weber swap will not pass California emmissions. If where you live you have similar restrictions then it will also not pass.

2. A Weber swap is not very cheap affair. Its not super expensive, but you have to shop around for a good deal (used carbs often require rebuilds, reconditioning, or tune-up, which adds to the price of a swap).

3. You will have to tune the carburetor yourself most likely, which is not a big deal since there are plenty of resources online and in print. Just be prepared to not find very many technicians that have mastered the "black art" of optimal carburetion (then again our EEC is much more of a bewilderment to mechanics, so this may not be a concern at all, Webers are far more straightforward and can be tended to by the owner/driver with simple hand tools).


Hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That all sounds good,

Where i live there are no emnissions standards at all so anything goes basically. Thats why I asked about emissions equipment because i could scrap it if it hurts gas milage. My carb works well now i get 500km or about 310 miles a gallon, just basically seeing if i could stretch it more. I looks like i would probably wait till this carb failed before getting the webber setup. What are peoples thoughts on the emissions gear?
 

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Viva el iPod
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sentrapower said:
That all sounds good,

Where i live there are no emnissions standards at all so anything goes basically. Thats why I asked about emissions equipment because i could scrap it if it hurts gas milage. My carb works well now i get 500km or about 310 miles a gallon, just basically seeing if i could stretch it more. I looks like i would probably wait till this carb failed before getting the webber setup. What are peoples thoughts on the emissions gear?
310 miles a gallon, really? ;)

Anyways, the emissions equipment is crude IMO, but those were the times, at least in the US. Emission equipment varies from country to country, but generally until the 90s, emission equipment was a big hinderence to performance. Now its not so much, as engines have become more effcient, which the ultimate "green" modification.
 

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any links to share other than webcon.co.uk

cant seem to find real indepth explaination and guide in tuning

So far i`m only able to find resources that covers weber lightly....

need something more indepth like

maximing the powerband of the car based on tuning the jets
troubleshooting

most of the links i found just teaches u how to do basic tuning...

if all else fails..

i`m getting myself a book... it better have something resourcefull...

btw,
i got a dcnva 36.. its going into my e15 after feb...

doing some recon work for now.. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
bII said:
310 miles a gallon, really? ;)

Anyways, the emissions equipment is crude IMO, but those were the times, at least in the US. Emission equipment varies from country to country, but generally until the 90s, emission equipment was a big hinderence to performance. Now its not so much, as engines have become more effcient, which the ultimate "green" modification.
Hey BII

I saw an old thread of yours which talked about how the webber carb is actually fairly common ( put on chevettes etc.) If so
I might be able to get one from the wreckers and use it as a core for a trade in. Is it possible for me to just buy the adapter plate and throttle linkage seperately?
Thanks
 

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Viva el iPod
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sentrapower said:
Hey BII

I saw an old thread of yours which talked about how the webber carb is actually fairly common ( put on chevettes etc.) If so
I might be able to get one from the wreckers and use it as a core for a trade in. Is it possible for me to just buy the adapter plate and throttle linkage seperately?
Thanks
You'll need to identify the carburetor correctly however, since there are a couple of variants (I don't recall the name of the series, but there is one that is emmsion-specific, which has ports you don't want, DFV I think). The DGV series carburetor is not standard equipment on any car you might find in a junkyard as far as I know (some domestics came with a weber-licensed Holly built version, the Capri and Vega I think), but its quite possible. You stand a better chance finding one on eBay. By common I meant that they are used as aftermarket replacement on MANY 4/6 cylinder vehicles.

If you get one with a manual or water-heated choke, you can also get an electric choke separately.

Redline Weber sells adapters for Nissans, so that is not a problem.


One thing to remember is that if you don't buy a new carb, you want to buy one that was on an aplication as close to the one you have, this makes for less tuning. Mine was off an autocrossed Porsche 914, which a believe has close to the same displacement, but less (or similar) VE. It fit beautifully on my car, required some adjustment for better idle and mid range power (no more than turning a few screws, I didn't have to rejet or anything).

If you buy one from a JY, it will likely be in need of servicing, since it has probably been sitting exposed to the elements, and worse sitting unsed with old gas. This is bad, servicing costs money, since its not recommended you service it yourself (too many things can break if you don't have expierance, more besides, you don't know what to look for, and it looks like a PITA IMO quite frankly). That can turn a good deal into less so, you'll have to decide for yourself, since many factors play into it.
 
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