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Discussion Starter #1
aight ive never done an engine rebuild before, but ive heard ppl do it in liek under 5 hours and stuff. is it really hard? im not genious but i can read a book or is it harder than reading a book? im interested in cleaning out the engine manually and replacing gaskets really not really into performance parts at the moment. but ppl also tell me not ot bother with my car cause im only 18 and they say i should let it be a junker car till i get a new one but im fairly fond of this one, am i getting to attached to my car? lol
 

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Its not a 5 hour job thats for sure. It does involve a lot of time and effort. Im going to by another engine and rebuild that one so I still have my car when I need it. When the one in the car goes in goes the better performance rebuilt one that will be sitting in the living room for a little while.
 

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Rebuilding an engine is a precision art. If you've never done one yourself,
get somebody that's done it before to help you. Get some books on engine
building to at least get familiar with the procedures. Get a Nissan FSM
which is a must. If you don't know what you're doing, you can make some very
costly mistakes along the way.

Basically what you'll be doing is disassembling, cleaning, taking the parts
to a machine shop for reconditioning, then measuring and measuring and
measuring, and reassembling.

Some of the basic things that need to be done for starters is getting the
block boiled and magnefluxed, measuring the cylinders for out-of-round and
taper then determining if the cylinders need only to be honed or bored to
the next oversize. The crank needs to be magneflux and straightened then the
journals measured to determine if they need to be reground to the next
undersize. The rods need to be magnefluxed and straightened. If the block
had to be honed or rebored, new pistons will be required.

There's a lot to reassembly. Measuring piston-to-wall clearances, measuring
rod/main bearing clearances, wrist pin clearances, rod side clearances,
crank end play, setting up piston ring gaps. The list goes on.

If you've never done this type of engine work, better get some professional
help.
 
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