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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone here ever installed the ES Hyper Flex system on the classic SE-R? I have a 1992 and was thinking of attempting the install myself. I was wondering if any of the old bushings needed to be pressed out or will I be able to remove them with common tools?
 

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getting the old suspension parts apart is a BIG pain in the ass. A lot of work but doable in your driveway. It helps handleing and everything a ton.

BRent
 

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bitter old man
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My garage-kept southern car comes apart rather easily. So, if that Jawja SE-R hasn't seen much winter salt, you have a reasonable chance to get things apart.

That said, the rear lateral arms were not designed for bushing replacement. FSM calls for replacing entire arm. The bushings do come out, but requires some serious tools, namely a BFH and a blue wrench. A typical press doesn't cut the mustard. Inserting the urethane bushings are a breeze.

The control arm front bushing can be removed with a press and the rear bushing is simply held in place by a bracket.

I noticed very little change with the urethane bushings, mainly that the suspension seemed more honest, i.e., I noticed a lack of fore-aft compliance that wasn't observable until it was missing. It was a small but incremental benefit along with all the other suspension mods. Yes, there was more impact harshness and more road noise, but the stiff springs were the major contribution to that.
 

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Fearsome Fabricator
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I found changing the bushings made a huge difference on an otherwise bone-stock car. It changed the handling from "I'd rather kill myself that drive this mushy floppy turd every day" to "This is actually quite fun." Mind you, this was an XE, not an SE-R.

By blue wrench, do you mean a torch? Indispensible.

Assembly was easy, except for re-installing the rear struts, as there was now no longer any compliance in the bushings to get the strut back on the knuckle.

Good luck!

Greg
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I think I'm going to give them a try. Shox.com has the kit for my car for $119. My car is in DESPERATE need of a front end overhaul. The bushing where the front sway bar connects to the control arm is totally gone. By the way, I may need to replace the connecting rod at the end of the sway bar, because it is bent towards the rear. Does anyone know where I could get this part from? What does Nissan call this part?
 

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It's called a swaybar endlink. You could probably get one from Pepboys, or any auto supply store. I just bought one but haven't had time to install it. Cost me CAN$50
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I called a local shop the other day to inquire about having the bushings installed and the guy wouldn't even give me a quote! His response was, "You wouldn't want to pay the labor charges...". What type of crap is that?
 

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Fearsome Fabricator
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That's called cold, stark reality my good man.

Every shop I have ever known charged "straight time" on custom work. That means that whatever the job takes to get done, that's what you get billed.

"Flat rate" is a common method of charging - if the book says it takes 5 hours to change a transmission, you are charged 5 hours, regardless if it takes 2 hours or 10 hours. A mechanic who can do it in 2 hours makes money for himself, as he gets paid for the 5, but now has 3 hours left to make more money. This is where crappy mechanics show up trying to "beat the system."

Straight time gets expensive. It took me 8 hours to change my bushings myself. I could probably do it a bit faster now that I know how it's done. If a shop charges $50/hour, you're looking at $400 right away. If bolts don't come undone easily, or a bolt breaks, just keep adding more money on. You should also get an alignment afterwards too.

Since you are billed straight time, and the mechanic is paid straight time, there is no obligation on the part of the shop to "hurry up." If the job takes 10 hours, or 12 or 14 hours, hey! More money for the shop.

You can do it yourself if you have competant mechanical aptitude, a good set of wrenches, a pry bar, a vise and a torch. Think of what you could do with that $400-700 you save!

Greg
 
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