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Your electrical friend
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Only my back window, which took in excess of 8 hours of carefull work with a razor scraper and several cans of Dirtex. When I have my tint done, I'm going to a place that's been around for at least 10 years and guarantees their work so that if it does it again, they can take it off and redo it on their time and at their cost.
 
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Bubby windows

Yup, I also have that. I kinda like it though...makes the car look it has scales!
 

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Aaaayh!
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439 Posts
the reason it bubbles up in the back window first is because of your defroster. If you turn it on and leave it on it will cause the tint to start to come off. There is some kind of tint that is not supposed to fade or turn purple. It is more expensive though.
 

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I have been told that 3M window tint is very good tint. Wherever you get it done ask them what type they're using.
 

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Your electrical friend
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2,177 Posts
the reason it bubbles up in the back window first is because of your defroster. If you turn it on and leave it on it will cause the tint to start to come off.
Not true. Defroster grids barely get hot, not near as hot as a window gets setting in the sun during the summer. Bubbling will not happen if the tint is installed correctly and the surface is properly prepped. A good tint shop will guarantee against bubbling. Cheap tint does turn purple and the more expensive brands like 3M are guaranteed not to turn purple. However they all fade with time. I had 3M on my truck and when I took my Oakley sticker off the back window you could see a darker area where the sticker used to be.
 

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Your electrical friend
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No the defroster doesn't peel off. However, when you're removing the glue with a razorblade and Dirtex (You can also use zippo fluid) you have to be really carefull not to cut the defroster lines. If you do there is a Conductive siler composition repair fluid you can buy. (Dupont 4817 or equivalent). You paint it on the broken spots and dry it with a heat gun (I suspect a hair dryer would suffice) or let it sit for 24 hours. I had to use a razordblade to get the tint off as well, it woulnd't come off in a nice sheet, but rather tiny little pieces. I think I've got over 8 hours into it. So the moral is, if it bubbles, pay to have it taken off if it doesn't come off in a nice sheet. Usually the tint sheet will stay intact if you're carefull and what remains is the glue. That's where the dirtex works wonders, dissolves the stuff on contact.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Now...I know that this has very little to do with tinting..but I am only 16...do you think I could possibly try tinting by my self?
Tonight I am going to try to remove the rear window tint..and I am heading towards Auto Zone or Checker Auto Parts..to buy a cheap 12 roll of tint.

However, how do you apply tint? Is it like a sticker? Remove the back and stick to the window? Or do you spray something onto the window, then put on the tint?

My entire Passenger side windows both front and back (4 door) and the rear winshield is bubbled, I have already removed the side windows in a smooth single sheet.

Professionally, how much would it cost on average for all side windows... Drivers Passengers and 2 rear passenger windows and the rear windshield cost?

200$ maybe? What if all of teh original tinting was removed first? Would it still cost as much?
 

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Your electrical friend
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Usually they lay the tint on the outside of the car and cut it to the right size with a razor knife. Be careful not to cut into the glass if you're doing it yourself. If you're having it done, read the fine print before you sign anything. If it says release of liability anywhere or they mention damage they might cause, or that cuts in the glass are typical, tell them to eat shit, because they're not being legit. Been there, done that, and they guy ended up closing shop to avoid being taken to court. Go to a place that's been around awhile, and still, don't sign shit until the car is done with and you've looked it over really close. (If you're not of legal age, then sign whatever you like, because you can't legally forfeit your rights if you're not of legal age). Anyways, they clean the glass off on the inside with window cleaner and a razor blade. Then they roll the window down just a little to start it right at the edge of the glass. Then they spray the glass with a water and soap mixture, peel the backing off of the tint and put the tint on. It's like hanging wallpaper. The watery soap mixture keeps the adhesive from attaching to the glass while you get the tint lined up and you spread the tint smooth, pushing any bubbles out to the edges to dissipate them. Then they roll the window up all the way and finish squeegeeing the tint down. Then after 24 hours the soapy water mixture is gone and the glue takes hold. There should never be any bubbles or creases. If any bubbles are there at all, they should be near the edges and can be pressed out to the edge with your finger. I've never done it myself but have seen it done several times. I would think you could have your whole car done for under $200. I don't know what removal costs, I don't imagine it is cheap though, especially if your back window does what mine did. I think mine did that because they used two layers on the back window and rear side windows to get it darker, instead of using the right percentage to begin with. The layer on the outside of the glass, inside the car, came off easy. The buried layer is the one that came off in shreds on the back window. I'll probably attempt to do it myself, but I'm not so sure I want to deal with bubbling on a defroster grid window again, and all because I wanted to save some money. You'd have to make sure you got that soap/water solution mixed correctly though. If you buy a kit that comes with the whole thing then you should be ok.
 
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