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Discussion Starter #1
should i just stick with the ngk coppers. cold spark plugs right? or go with irridium. anyone know the model numbers of each variety.
 

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copper and irridium are both good performance wise, irridium just lasts much longer than copper. i would stay away from platinum and especially anything bosch. ngk and denso both make good products for our cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
NickZac said:
copper and irridium are both good performance wise, irridium just lasts much longer than copper. i would stay away from platinum and especially anything bosch. ngk and denso both make good products for our cars.

thanks bro..i always used ngk's for my de.. but with the det i wondered if there was a difference.
 

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apoklyps60 said:
should i just stick with the ngk coppers. cold spark plugs right? or go with irridium. anyone know the model numbers of each variety.
I am using NGK BKR6E plugs on my DE + T gapped to 0.030" This should be good to 10-12psi (I have no problems at 9psi). If you are running stock boost, these should work well.

The plats (if you choose to use them) come gapped at 0.040" and should also be gaped down to 0.030" for use in a boosted engine.

Lew
 

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Discussion Starter #5
lshadoff said:
I am using NGK BKR6E plugs on my DE + T gapped to 0.030" This should be good to 10-12psi (I have no problems at 9psi). If you are running stock boost, these should work well.

The plats (if you choose to use them) come gapped at 0.040" and should also be gaped down to 0.030" for use in a boosted engine.

Lew
thanks for the info bro. do you know if the plucgs you have are hot or cold plugs?
 

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apoklyps60 said:
thanks for the info bro. do you know if the plucgs you have are hot or cold plugs?
These are the standard heat range for the SR20DE. They have never indicated that they were too hot for the way I drive. If you want to go colder, use BKR7E, and check for fouling (black) after driving a few hundred miles.

Lew
 

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lshadoff said:
. If you want to go colder, use BKR7E, and check for fouling (black) after driving a few hundred miles.

Actually Lew, with NGK a higher number indicates a hotter plug. So the bkr6e is the colder plug. This is what i beleive to be true.
 

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ser_smokes_alot said:
lshadoff said:
. If you want to go colder, use BKR7E, and check for fouling (black) after driving a few hundred miles.
Actually Lew, with NGK a higher number indicates a hotter plug. So the bkr6e is the colder plug. This is what i beleive to be true.
The B14 FSM states:

Standard type - BKR6E
Hot Type - BKR5E
Cold Type - BKR7E

Lew
 

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an interesting but necessary point is that heat ranges are not the same between brands



from sparkplugs.com
 

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Some more interesting info from www.Sparkplugs.com

How do I find a colder or hotter plug?

"Typically, after you consult the appropriate manufacturers numbering system for your plug, (each manufacturer is listed on the bottom left of the 411 info page), you will be able to figure out how to go colder or hotter for each brand.

The main exception would be the NGK racing plugs, any NGK that starts with an “R” is a racing plug (it is important you note we said it starts with an “R”, not that it has an “R” in it) For the NGK racing plugs, the heat range is after the dash IE: R5671A-10 is a 10 heat range. After you think you have arrived at the part number you want, enter it into the Part number / cross reference search and see if it exists. If so, add it to the cart."

Heat range

"The term spark plug heat range refers to the speed with which the plug can transfer heat from the combustion chamber to the engine head. Whether the plug is to be installed in a boat, lawnmower or racecar, it has been found the optimum combustion chamber temperature for gasoline engines is between 500°C–850°C. When it is within that range it is cool enough to avoid pre-ignition and plug tip overheating (which can cause engine damage), while still hot enough to burn off combustion deposits which cause fouling.

The spark plug can help maintain the optimum combustion chamber temperature. The primary method used to do this is by altering the internal length of the core nose, in addition, the alloy compositions in the electrodes can be changed. This means you may not be able to visually tell a difference between heat ranges. When a spark plug is referred to as a “cold plug”, it is one that transfers heat rapidly from the firing tip into the engine head, which keeps the firing tip cooler. A “hot plug” has a much slower rate of heat transfer, which keeps the firing tip hotter.

An unaltered engine will run within the optimum operating range straight from the manufacturer, but if you make modifications such as a turbo, supercharger, increase compression, timing changes, use of alternate racing fuels, or sustained use of nitrous oxide, these can alter the plug tip temperature and may necessitate a colder plug. A rule of thumb is, one heat range colder per modification or one heat range colder for every 75–100hp you increase. In identical spark plug types, the difference from one full heat range to the next is the ability to remove 70°C to 100°C from the combustion chamber.

The heat range numbers used by spark plug manufacturers are not universal, by that we mean, a 10 heat range in Champion is not the same as a 10 heat range in NGK nor the same in Autolite. Some manufacturers numbering systems are opposite the other, for domestic manufacturers (Champion, Autolite, Splitfire), the higher the number, the hotter the plug. For Japanese manufacturers (NGK, Denso), the higher the number, the colder the plug.

Do not make spark plug changes at the same time as another engine modification such as injection, carburetion or timing changes as in the event of poor results, it can lead to misleading and inaccurate conclusions (an exception would be when the alternate plugs came as part of a single precalibrated upgrade kit). When making spark plug heat range changes, it is better to err on the side of too cold a plug. The worst thing that can happen from too cold a plug is a fouled spark plug, too hot a spark plug can cause severe engine damage"
 

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some may say copper but i say irridium. i know a lot of guys using them in turbo cars and loving it. just dont use platinum. and be sure to run the heat range to the specs of the det motor. Remember, 1 heat range colder for every 75-100 HP increase.
 

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im hearing such good things about irradium that im gonna go get them for my beat 89, 13 bucks a peice for denso's but hell they never wear out and fire awsome so its worth it, now i just need 5 bucks...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
lol.. so get the ngk irridiums 1 degree colder for a us spec 93 sr20. or to make it easier does anyone have the model number for it specifically?
 

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go and get a set of ngk bk6re's and see if that heat range is what you want to work with. they are only a couple of bucks a piece. this way if you run rich for some reason you don't foul up expensive plugs. if you have already had your setup for a while you could use the iridium plugs but not cheap if you foul them up.
 

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ser_smokes_alot said:
lshadoff said:
. If you want to go colder, use BKR7E, and check for fouling (black) after driving a few hundred miles.

Actually Lew, with NGK a higher number indicates a hotter plug. So the bkr6e is the colder plug. This is what i beleive to be true.

Its the other way around. The lower the hotter. Stick with NGK coppers, 90 percent of sr20forum use them. They are tried and proven. :) No use wasting money on more expensive plugs.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
ok thank you all for the help. FYI talked to ngk themselves and found that the stock plugs on a det from ngk are a 5 heat rating. and they do make ngk-r's for the det but that is only if you are running high amounts of boost. which is almost 4 steps colder than the stock det's plugs. i ordered the Lfr6aix-11 irridium plugs. i will only be running 10-12 lbs of boost. most likely 10. so from what the tech at ngk told me even if i were to run 18 lbs he would go only one step from the Lfr6aix-11 to Lfr7aix-11. thank you everyone for your input it helped me make a decision. :thumbup:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
NGK.com is a distributor for NGK. Here is Ngk's # 877-473-6767.

ask to speak to a technician..the customer service people dont know jack. i dont know if the gti-r block uses the same plugs. i got the info for a bluebird det u12 and u13. hope it helps dude.
 
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