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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello Everyone!

My car is 2007 Altima, odometer reading 185000+ miles. I drained the coolant 2 weeks ago and completely changed the new coolant. Before the drain no leak at all but I found that the coolant drips very slowly(less than 10 drops) after. I did use 1 bottle of Bar's leaks liquid aluminum(1186) but still found there is a point that always being wet. Please see attached pictures. I knew Bar's leaks is targeting the aluminum part of the radiator. So I am thinking it may not work for the leaking spot which is made of plastic. I would like to ask if any products I can use to completely stop leaking. Or do I really need a new radiator? Thank you!
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Those pics are of the corner of the A/C condenser and not the radiator, so it's hard to tell what we're looking at. You might be best putting some UV dye in the coolant to show you exactly where the leak is. Even metallic sealers only work well on pinholes in the aluminum tubes, cracks at the tube ends, damage to plastic tanks, or bad tank gaskets all generally require a new radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Those pics are of the corner of the A/C condenser and not the radiator, so it's hard to tell what we're looking at. You might be best putting some UV dye in the coolant to show you exactly where the leak is. Even metallic sealers only work well on pinholes in the aluminum tubes, cracks at the tube ends, damage to plastic tanks, or bad tank gaskets all generally require a new radiator.
Thank you for the reply. You taught me a lesson. I am a very very new DIYer and know nothing about the cooling system in a car. I will try the UV dye. The leaking really makes me think changing the new coolant may not be a good idea for my car. 😂
 

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If you decide to replace the radiator and can't find any tips regarding this task.......

Remove the phillips-head screws below the front bumper cover. These screws secure the "splash shields" to the bottom of the bumper cover.

Use a Philips head screwdriver to manipulate the radiator drain plug which is located on the bottom passenger side of the radiator. Drain the radiator.

Move the fender liner in such a manner as to allow access to the 10mm bolt which is located at the top (of each) corner/edge of the ends of the bumper cover.......where the top corner of the bumper cover meets the front fenders.

Pull the top side edges of the bumper cover away from each fender.

Open the hood and remove the half dozen or so push-pins which secure the top of the bumper cover and grill to the car.

If equipped, disconnect the fog light connectors behind the bumper cover.

Remove the bumper cover.

Remove the styrofoam pad from along the front of the (metal) bumper reinforcement.

Use a 13mm socket/extension to remove the six nuts which secure the (metal) bumper reinforcement onto the car. Three nuts on each end of this bumper.

Disconnect the electrical connector from the air conditioner condenser. This connector is located on the front of the condenser (near driver's side headlight).

Remove the two air deflectors from along side the air conditioner condenser. There is one deflector per side. They just snap in and out of place.

On each side of the air condenser, you will see a tab which will need to be pressed towards the radiator in order to allow the condenser to be pushed in an upwards motion to free it from it's retaining slot......these retaining slots are built into the radiator mould. Look at the new radiator to get an idea of how the tabs are manipulated.

Remove the coolant expansion tank from the car. To do this, you will need pliers of some sort to remove the small hose clamp from the radiator cap housing and disconnect that small hose. Use a 10mm socket/extension to remove the fastener which secures the bottom of the coolant expansion tank to the chassis rail of the car. Pull this tank directly upwards to separate it and remove it from the car.

Remove the 10mm bolt which anchors the a/c line to the chassis rail (below the coolant tank). Doing this will allow for enough movement to.....

......move the air conditioner condenser away from the front of the radiator. (Remember, first press the tabs moulded into the radiator to slide up, and disengage the a/c condenser from the radiator slots.

Remove the 10mm bolt which secures the cosmetic above the passenger side of the radiator. Once that bolt is removed, you can pull up on that cover and get it out of the way.

Remove the 10mm bolt which secures the coolant filler neck to the car.

Manipulate the large hose clamp on the hose attached to the bottom of the filler neck and separate that hose from the filler neck. (The radiator filler neck, this is the part which has the radiator cap attached onto it).

Look closely at the tops of each corner of the radiator. Each corner has one oddly shaped retaining clip securing the radiator to the vehicle. Remove each of these clips to pull the top of the radiator away from the car.

Lift the radiator upwards and away from the car in such a manner that the dowels at the bottom of the radiator come free of their slots.

There are two transmission fluid hoses attached onto the backside of the radiator. These hoses are located on the driver's side of the radiator.

Use long needle nose pliers to manipulate the hose clamp on the top transmission fluid hose. Separate that hose from the radiator.

The lower transmission fluid hose......use long 90° angled needle nose pliers to detach the lower hose.

Use large chanel lock pliers to manipulate the large lower radiator coolant hose clamp and separate that hose from the radiator.

At this point the radiator should be able to be manipulated away from the car.

Notes:

A little transmission fluid will dribble out of the transmission lines when detached from the radiator. Have a rag handy to stick in the area to soak up the fluid.

Upon reassembly, the dowels located on the bottom of the radiator will need to slide into place at the same time that the top transmission fluid hose slides thru a slot near it's location on the car.

If you break the radiator cap housing, a new replacement piece can be purchased for $30 at virtually any retail auto parts store. This piece is technically called "coolant filler neck". And the Dorman Replacement Part Number is 902-5938......better to call ahead and have one readily available if needed rather than having to wait for a new one to be ordered/delivered. In my experiences, if the radiator on these cars is bad, chances that the coolant filler neck is just as rotten on the inside.

No need to use the exact tools I mentioned, they're just the ones I chose to use myself. I do this stuff on a daily basis and have a good idea of what tools work best given most any situation. If you have power tools and a 10,000 pound vehicle lift such as myself, this is a 30 minute job. If not, it's probably a 2 hour job on the ground.

Nothing is difficult about this repair.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you decide to replace the radiator and can't find any tips regarding this task.......

Remove the phillips-head screws below the front bumper cover. These screws secure the "splash shields" to the bottom of the bumper cover.

Use a Philips head screwdriver to manipulate the radiator drain plug which is located on the bottom passenger side of the radiator. Drain the radiator.

Move the fender liner in such a manner as to allow access to the 10mm bolt which is located at the top (of each) corner/edge of the ends of the bumper cover.......where the top corner of the bumper cover meets the front fenders.

Pull the top side edges of the bumper cover away from each fender.

Open the hood and remove the half dozen or so push-pins which secure the top of the bumper cover and grill to the car.

If equipped, disconnect the fog light connectors behind the bumper cover.

Remove the bumper cover.

Remove the styrofoam pad from along the front of the (metal) bumper reinforcement.

Use a 13mm socket/extension to remove the six nuts which secure the (metal) bumper reinforcement onto the car. Three nuts on each end of this bumper.

Disconnect the electrical connector from the air conditioner condenser. This connector is located on the front of the condenser (near driver's side headlight).

Remove the two air deflectors from along side the air conditioner condenser. There is one deflector per side. They just snap in and out of place.

On each side of the air condenser, you will see a tab which will need to be pressed towards the radiator in order to allow the condenser to be pushed in an upwards motion to free it from it's retaining slot......these retaining slots are built into the radiator mould. Look at the new radiator to get an idea of how the tabs are manipulated.

Remove the coolant expansion tank from the car. To do this, you will need pliers of some sort to remove the small hose clamp from the radiator cap housing and disconnect that small hose. Use a 10mm socket/extension to remove the fastener which secures the bottom of the coolant expansion tank to the chassis rail of the car. Pull this tank directly upwards to separate it and remove it from the car.

Remove the 10mm bolt which anchors the a/c line to the chassis rail (below the coolant tank). Doing this will allow for enough movement to.....

......move the air conditioner condenser away from the front of the radiator. (Remember, first press the tabs moulded into the radiator to slide up, and disengage the a/c condenser from the radiator slots.

Remove the 10mm bolt which secures the cosmetic above the passenger side of the radiator. Once that bolt is removed, you can pull up on that cover and get it out of the way.

Remove the 10mm bolt which secures the coolant filler neck to the car.

Manipulate the large hose clamp on the hose attached to the bottom of the filler neck and separate that hose from the filler neck. (The radiator filler neck, this is the part which has the radiator cap attached onto it).

Look closely at the tops of each corner of the radiator. Each corner has one oddly shaped retaining clip securing the radiator to the vehicle. Remove each of these clips to pull the top of the radiator away from the car.

Lift the radiator upwards and away from the car in such a manner that the dowels at the bottom of the radiator come free of their slots.

There are two transmission fluid hoses attached onto the backside of the radiator. These hoses are located on the driver's side of the radiator.

Use long needle nose pliers to manipulate the hose clamp on the top transmission fluid hose. Separate that hose from the radiator.

The lower transmission fluid hose......use long 90° angled needle nose pliers to detach the lower hose.

Use large chanel lock pliers to manipulate the large lower radiator coolant hose clamp and separate that hose from the radiator.

At this point the radiator should be able to be manipulated away from the car.

Notes:

A little transmission fluid will dribble out of the transmission lines when detached from the radiator. Have a rag handy to stick in the area to soak up the fluid.

Upon reassembly, the dowels located on the bottom of the radiator will need to slide into place at the same time that the top transmission fluid hose slides thru a slot near it's location on the car.

If you break the radiator cap housing, a new replacement piece can be purchased for $30 at virtually any retail auto parts store. This piece is technically called "coolant filler neck". And the Dorman Replacement Part Number is 902-5938......better to call ahead and have one readily available if needed rather than having to wait for a new one to be ordered/delivered. In my experiences, if the radiator on these cars is bad, chances that the coolant filler neck is just as rotten on the inside.

No need to use the exact tools I mentioned, they're just the ones I chose to use myself. I do this stuff on a daily basis and have a good idea of what tools work best given most any situation. If you have power tools and a 10,000 pound vehicle lift such as myself, this is a 30 minute job. If not, it's probably a 2 hour job on the ground.

Nothing is difficult about this repair.

Good luck.
Thank you so much for the guidance. I will reference when I have to change the radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Those pics are of the corner of the A/C condenser and not the radiator, so it's hard to tell what we're looking at. You might be best putting some UV dye in the coolant to show you exactly where the leak is. Even metallic sealers only work well on pinholes in the aluminum tubes, cracks at the tube ends, damage to plastic tanks, or bad tank gaskets all generally require a new radiator.
Hello! I uploaded 2 more pictures after I used UV dye. Do the last 2 pics show that the coolant is leaking from the side of the radiator?
I did fill the coolant reservoir 2cm higher than the maximum line. Could this be the problem?
Thank you!
 

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Yep....definitely a bad radiator. Looks like the tank seal has failed on the radiator. There is no repair for this failure due to the fact that the tank (side of the radiator) is made of plastic while the finned part of the radiator is aluminum. The solution requires a new radiator. Most cost effective way to obtain a new radiator is online (not retail store).

Overfilling these coolant reservoirs will not damage the radiator. These coolant reservoirs are vented, therefore they do not retain any pressures. The way it works is: The engine coolant heats up. Pressure in the cooling system prevents the coolant from boiling. In some instances, the coolant will achieve 16+ psi pressure. When this happens, the pressure is great enough that the engine coolant escapes past the radiator cap. As it passes the radiator cap, the pressure on the coolant drops significantly resulting in the liquified coolant becoming a vapor........steam. In this situation, the steam travels and is collected in the reservoir. And it cools down. As the steam vapor cools, it turns back into liquid its form and remains in the reservoir until the engine cools off. As the engine cools off, the pressure in the cooling system drops. As this pressure decays, the result is the liquid in the reservoir gets sucked back up past the radiator cap and re enters the radiator. The cycle repeats.
 

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If you decide to replace the radiator and can't find any tips regarding this task.......

Remove the phillips-head screws below the front bumper cover. These screws secure the "splash shields" to the bottom of the bumper cover.

Use a Philips head screwdriver to manipulate the radiator drain plug which is located on the bottom passenger side of the radiator. Drain the radiator.

Move the fender liner in such a manner as to allow access to the 10mm bolt which is located at the top (of each) corner/edge of the ends of the bumper cover.......where the top corner of the bumper cover meets the front fenders.

Pull the top side edges of the bumper cover away from each fender.

Open the hood and remove the half dozen or so push-pins which secure the top of the bumper cover and grill to the car.

If equipped, disconnect the fog light connectors behind the bumper cover.

Remove the bumper cover.

Remove the styrofoam pad from along the front of the (metal) bumper reinforcement.

Use a 13mm socket/extension to remove the six nuts which secure the (metal) bumper reinforcement onto the car. Three nuts on each end of this bumper.

Disconnect the electrical connector from the air conditioner condenser. This connector is located on the front of the condenser (near driver's side headlight).

Remove the two air deflectors from along side the air conditioner condenser. There is one deflector per side. They just snap in and out of place.

On each side of the air condenser, you will see a tab which will need to be pressed towards the radiator in order to allow the condenser to be pushed in an upwards motion to free it from it's retaining slot......these retaining slots are built into the radiator mould. Look at the new radiator to get an idea of how the tabs are manipulated.

Remove the coolant expansion tank from the car. To do this, you will need pliers of some sort to remove the small hose clamp from the radiator cap housing and disconnect that small hose. Use a 10mm socket/extension to remove the fastener which secures the bottom of the coolant expansion tank to the chassis rail of the car. Pull this tank directly upwards to separate it and remove it from the car.

Remove the 10mm bolt which anchors the a/c line to the chassis rail (below the coolant tank). Doing this will allow for enough movement to.....

......move the air conditioner condenser away from the front of the radiator. (Remember, first press the tabs moulded into the radiator to slide up, and disengage the a/c condenser from the radiator slots.

Remove the 10mm bolt which secures the cosmetic above the passenger side of the radiator. Once that bolt is removed, you can pull up on that cover and get it out of the way.

Remove the 10mm bolt which secures the coolant filler neck to the car.

Manipulate the large hose clamp on the hose attached to the bottom of the filler neck and separate that hose from the filler neck. (The radiator filler neck, this is the part which has the radiator cap attached onto it).

Look closely at the tops of each corner of the radiator. Each corner has one oddly shaped retaining clip securing the radiator to the vehicle. Remove each of these clips to pull the top of the radiator away from the car.

Lift the radiator upwards and away from the car in such a manner that the dowels at the bottom of the radiator come free of their slots.

There are two transmission fluid hoses attached onto the backside of the radiator. These hoses are located on the driver's side of the radiator.

Use long needle nose pliers to manipulate the hose clamp on the top transmission fluid hose. Separate that hose from the radiator.

The lower transmission fluid hose......use long 90° angled needle nose pliers to detach the lower hose.

Use large chanel lock pliers to manipulate the large lower radiator coolant hose clamp and separate that hose from the radiator.

At this point the radiator should be able to be manipulated away from the car.

Notes:

A little transmission fluid will dribble out of the transmission lines when detached from the radiator. Have a rag handy to stick in the area to soak up the fluid.

Upon reassembly, the dowels located on the bottom of the radiator will need to slide into place at the same time that the top transmission fluid hose slides thru a slot near it's location on the car.

If you break the radiator cap housing, a new replacement piece can be purchased for $30 at virtually any retail auto parts store. This piece is technically called "coolant filler neck". And the Dorman Replacement Part Number is 902-5938......better to call ahead and have one readily available if needed rather than having to wait for a new one to be ordered/delivered. In my experiences, if the radiator on these cars is bad, chances that the coolant filler neck is just as rotten on the inside.

No need to use the exact tools I mentioned, they're just the ones I chose to use myself. I do this stuff on a daily basis and have a good idea of what tools work best given most any situation. If you have power tools and a 10,000 pound vehicle lift such as myself, this is a 30 minute job. If not, it's probably a 2 hour job on the ground.

Nothing is difficult about this repair.

Good luck.
Probably time for a new radiator if you're going to keep the car. Fairly easy job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yep....definitely a bad radiator. Looks like the tank seal has failed on the radiator. There is no repair for this failure due to the fact that the tank (side of the radiator) is made of plastic while the finned part of the radiator is aluminum. The solution requires a new radiator. Most cost effective way to obtain a new radiator is online (not retail store).

Overfilling these coolant reservoirs will not damage the radiator. These coolant reservoirs are vented, therefore they do not retain any pressures. The way it works is: The engine coolant heats up. Pressure in the cooling system prevents the coolant from boiling. In some instances, the coolant will achieve 16+ psi pressure. When this happens, the pressure is great enough that the engine coolant escapes past the radiator cap. As it passes the radiator cap, the pressure on the coolant drops significantly resulting in the liquified coolant becoming a vapor........steam. In this situation, the steam travels and is collected in the reservoir. And it cools down. As the steam vapor cools, it turns back into liquid its form and remains in the reservoir until the engine cools off. As the engine cools off, the pressure in the cooling system drops. As this pressure decays, the result is the liquid in the reservoir gets sucked back up past the radiator cap and re enters the radiator. The cycle repeats.
Thank you!
 
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