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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I know this has been talked about a bunch on here; I have scanned these forms a lot but have been unable to find a solution to my scenario of problems.

I have a 2006 Nissan Trail X Bonavista edition with an automatic ATC. Recently my blower motor completely stopped working; after reading the forms and following the awesome youtube video, I replaced the blower motor with an amazon part, but... the airflow is terrible; I can barely feel it. But man o man I can hear it, and after having the unit out of the vehicle and testing it.. it does blow a decent amount of air.

I could see the air control flaps from under the passenger seat are all in working order, I believe.
I believe the squirrel cage is spinning the correct way.

I need advice.
 

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If it spins freely when removed, then the cage has to be rubbing on something. Inspect the HVAC housing (by feel if necessary) for obstructions. If you find none, if the blower is aftermarket, there's a chance the tail bushing is inserted to the wrong depth and it's causing the cage to stick out too far from the motor. That can be fixed with Nissan-style BLDC's but not with brush motors (I don't know which kind an Exxie uses). If it's a brush motor you may need to take it back. I don't recommend trying to trim the cage unless you have a band sander to do it very neatly, because even small imbalances can cause early bearing failure.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It spins freely while installed.

Thanks for the help, but that doesn't seem to be my problem...
 

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It spins freely while installed.

Thanks for the help, but that doesn't seem to be my problem...
Ah, I misunderstood. Low airflow with a motor that spins like crazy means your intake is blocked. It's similar to putting your hand over the end of a vacuum cleaner hose, the motor RPM skyrockets because the impeller isn't doing any work. Check your cabin filter and cowl, you'll find a blockage there somewhere.
 

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PS - Check for water in the evap cavity as well, depending on the design of the HVAC sometimes that will also block airflow.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ah, I misunderstood. Low airflow with a motor that spins like crazy means your intake is blocked. It's similar to putting your hand over the end of a vacuum cleaner hose; the motor RPM skyrockets because the impeller isn't doing any work. Check your cabin filter and cowl; you'll find a blockage there somewhere.
I'll take a look tonight and let you know; Thanks!
 

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Ah, I misunderstood. Low airflow with a motor that spins like crazy means your intake is blocked. It's similar to putting your hand over the end of a vacuum cleaner hose, the motor RPM skyrockets because the impeller isn't doing any work. Check your cabin filter and cowl, you'll find a blockage there somewhere.
good advice. I am an auto glass technician and often while replacing a front windshield we need to take off the lower windshield cowl ( for those unfamiliar, it would be the plastic or aluminum shroud cover at the base of your windshield....under your front windshield wipers....covers the wiper mechanicals and such).
  • The debris and junk under that shroud can build up, blocking factory made water drainage holes and often causing that water to leak into the inside of the cabin at the floorboard under the dashboard.
  • Sometimes so much debris ( leaves, twigs, dirt, mud, bits of shredded paper, etc) that i need to clear it out by hand, vacuum and air line blower. I like to do preventative maintenance, so while that cowl/shroud is off , i inspect the wiper linkage and use the correct spray lubricants to keep things operating smoothly.
  • I always advise my customers to have a look at the before and after (install of the vehicle cowl) and suggest they do their best to keep this area clean. Best solution whenever possible...do not park under trees. But if you have no choice but to park outside all the time, at least be mindful of debris/leaves/junk under your windshield wiper area and clear it away by hand/vacuum it nice and clean. Basically it is a fresh air vent and why would you want to sit in your vehicle, turn on your ventilation system and inhale possible decaying leaves/twigs and whatever else just laying on top of that cowl?
 

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Versas are absolutely infamous for that.
what's your overall opinion of the Versas? Here in Vancouver i see a lot of the Versa hatchbacks. Mainly because Nissan sold them at a pretty cheapish low starting point. I have read a dozen or so online road test Versa reviews and many love the fact they sip gas, very roomy, VERSAtile , and have decent enough interior for a compact economy car.
  • I liked the look of the 2018 versa hatchback SR Note, but i realize it is no hot hatchback. A similar Honda Fit has more power , came with manual or 5 seed auto and probably better reliability overall. The big thing that would hold me back from buying a used Versa is the uncertainty of the CVT transmission.
  • What's your take on these Versa?
 

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what's your overall opinion of the Versas?
They're basic and reliable if all you want is transportation. Like any car, they have a few foibles. One is the tendency to flood the cowls as mentioned. They also have a frankly-silly painted bracket holding the ground cable to the tranny, if I bought one the first thing I would do is take it loose and grind the paint off the contact surfaces. The older ones have a two-thermostat setup that's a bit goofy, the newer ones have a 2-speed CVT that's sort of a modern "powerglide" which is also a bit goofy. The short wheelbase makes them a bit skittish at highway speed like most econoboxes. The 6-speeds, if you can find one, are a pile of fun to drive.
 

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They're basic and reliable if all you want is transportation. Like any car, they have a few foibles. One is the tendency to flood the cowls as mentioned. They also have a frankly-silly painted bracket holding the ground cable to the tranny, if I bought one the first thing I would do is take it loose and grind the paint off the contact surfaces. The older ones have a two-thermostat setup that's a bit goofy, the newer ones have a 2-speed CVT that's sort of a modern "powerglide" which is also a bit goofy. The short wheelbase makes them a bit skittish at highway speed like most econoboxes. The 6-speeds, if you can find one, are a pile of fun to drive.
thanks for your honest answer. I would also look for 6 speed manual. Only issue with that is these manual equipped Versas were most likely very basic trim levels with no AC, manual windows and more like a 1985 toyota corolla . Remember when we would buy a new or used vehicle and it was too plain and basic? Sometimes regretting buying it, but putting up with it because bought it cheaply and good mpg/reliability.
- Not that i have owned luxury vehicles, but kinda sucks going from a few nice automotive luxuries and back to a stripper econobox. Unless the car has some balls and a blast to drive. A friend long ago owned a 1985 mazda3 h/b and a cousin had a 1990 suzuki swift gt and those little shitboxes were fun to blast around in , even if they seemed cheapy and a bit crude.
 

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Not that i have owned luxury vehicles, but kinda sucks going from a few nice automotive luxuries and back to a stripper econobox. Unless the car has some balls and a blast to drive.
They're much ballsier with the 6-spd than the A/T, but I actually know a guy who dropped a turbo into one. What a hoot! The only thing you couldn't do was keep the front wheels on the ground when the boost came on. :p
 
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