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Discussion Starter #1
Looked through the forum but didn't find much infomation about this:

Is it better to add an aftermarket cruise control like an audiovox electronic with a rostra stick or go to the junkyard and search for a donor truck that has cruise control?

I have a 1997 HB King Cab 2WD with 5 speed manual transmission.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

JS
 

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I have a 91 HB KC w/5 sp. that the previous owner had installed aftermarket cruise and it works very well. Not sure what brand, don't see a name anywhere. The only drawback is there isn't an indicator light. A couple of times I've been cruising along and pushed in the clutch- revs to the moon! I haven't done that in a long time tho. The good thing about aftermarket is you'll get complete instructions. If you go the j/y route you'll be on your own.
 

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I concur, just buy an aftermarket kit. I've installed them in many vehicles, including a kei class minitruck. If it's your first one, then prepare to take some time to make sure that everything is installed correctly. I've gotten to the point where I can install one in the matter of an hour.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks everyone for responding.

I have seen one kit that is a "push pedal" and then another kit on a website that warns not to use a push pedal. Then I have seen electronic kits and vacuum kits. What is the difference and what should I buy for my truck?
 

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I've personally never heard of "push pedal" kits, and assume that these are more recent aftermarket versions designed to get around the "drive by wire" throttles that are being used in more new cars. I would not recommend using this version until they have a chance to prove that they are safe.

For our trucks, you can use either the vacuum actuated version or electronic version. Electronic cruise controls will give you more throttle response on hills, since they don't depend on engine vacuum to regulate the servo. Their downside is that you will have a slight dip in fuel mileage on hilly terrain over the vacuum version. Vacuum servos use engine vacuum to operate the servo. Their downside is that they will not use the full throttle travel as it will lose vacuum at full throttle. Fuel mileage is slightly better on hilly terrain, but you will lose more speed on hills. Vacuum servos can be slower to react to speed variations.

I have no problem with installing either version in a vehicle. Between those two, feel free to choose the one you like best.
 
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