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Discussion Starter #1
Don't hesitate; don't forget. As Nike says -Just Do It !!! You will be glad you did, unlike me and others who have neglected to check and change those crucial operating fluids!!:givebeer:
 

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To be specific...

Engine oil (duh)
Tranny fluid / oil
Transfer case fluid
Differential gear oil
Coolant

Also, belts, oil filter, air filter, cabin air filter, tranny filter, fuel filter, spark plugs, power steering fluid, brake fluid, brake pads and drums, greasing propeller shaft, tire rotation, and general inspection of everything else.

Even the slightest thing makes the biggest difference. My GF hasn't changed her coolant since she bought her car 8 years ago, for example, and now I get to deal with trying to fix a rusted, leaky radiator!

Almatti... any pics of the damage that can be caused? :cheers:
 

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A majority of the owners on here will say it's not necessary. They'll say, "I haven't changed it in years and it still runs like it's new."

They are the same ones, that when something finally does happen, WON'T come back on here and admit there is a problem. By then, they are replacing parts and guessing what the problem may be...:balls:
 

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I learned a lot of my fundamental car repair skills from my dad, but one thing I'm glad I didn't pick up is his disregard for maintenance.

He changes his oil and makes mechanical repairs, but almost nothing else. He thinks a lot of the maintenance I do is a waste of cash. "The car's running fine, you don't need to do anything!" (My usual reply: "The car runs fine with a couple litres of gas left, but that doesn't mean I let the tank completely empty out before I fill up.")

This is the same guy who ran straight, distilled water in his radiator during the summer back in the 60's, and claims you can still do it today. I try to tell him there's rust inhibitors in coolant, and it has a higher boiling point than straight water, but he shrugs off the rusting and says "coolant is mostly water, it has exactly the same boiling point".

Ah well, at least he has some nice, high ramps that give tons of clearance underneath when doing repairs, as well as a huge cache of tools. :p
 

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Also the most forgotten maintenance that is possibly the most costly is the timing belt. They don't give any warning and when they break cause major damage. Always remember that preventive maintenance is always better than reactive repair!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
sepz: Depending on the year of Pathy you have, there are many with Timing Chains. My 01 PF 3.5 engine has a Timing Chain, per my mechanic. I am going to confirm with looking in the manual today!!! I have 114k miles on the clock. The distilled water story by Matty is a good one. I remember adding water to radiators too. Oh shi###t, Am I that Old... Matty advise of Coolant checks and flushes is also a very Good One !!! I've done it a few years ago, time for that again...
 

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I wasn't referring to any particular one. But your mechanic is correct that your model does have a chain instead of a belt. All Pathys with the 3.0L V6 have timing belts. And are interference engines.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
A majority of the owners on here will say it's not necessary. They'll say, "I haven't changed it in years and it still runs like it's new."

They are the same ones, that when something finally does happen, WON'T come back on here and admit there is a problem. By then, they are replacing parts and guessing what the problem may be...:balls:
Metro: The plug in the X-fer case is 'frozen", can't loosen it to check the x-fer case oil. The U Joints on both driveshafts are being replaced tomorrow [I had a vibration problem, mechanic removed the front driveshaft and it was much much better, inspection revealed one bad U joint]. Lot's of advise seems to center on how to get this damn aluminum plug to loosen. One fellow , The Car Doctor on local NY Radio station recommended GIBBS Penetrant. Says it works chemically on the different metals to loosen what in essence is a "weld' created by the heat on the aluminum or that fact that when the transfer oil was replaced, the plug was not torqued or seated properly. Some people say Leave it alone, some say drill a new hole in the transfer case, some say put a torch on the metal. I'll elt everyone know more once the U joints are installed and the performance of the front transfer case is tested. Then we'll see about checking and/or replacing the fluid.
 
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