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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I did the '22 1.5T 3cyl oil change at 3,000 miles. It is different from my '21 Rogue 2.5 also done at 3,000 miles

Both '21 and 22 require removing the belly pan. Two 10mm bolts and 12-15 plastic push pins. Chrysler had a better idea with a flip down access panel on my '17 Pacifica.

The 1.5 used oil was the thinnest oil I've ever seen. It flowed like green/brown water and reeked of gasoline. I've had plenty of other cars with 0W20 oil and none have been like water on an oil change. It is definitely the thinnest and probably the nastiest looking and smelling oil in my experience and only after 3K miles.

I am stupefied that Nissan calls for a 10,000 mile oil change, a tiny filter fit for a lawnmower, and NO requirement for synthetic oil on a turbo. What's up with that Nissan? I doubt this engine will run 200-300K like a Toyota or Honda.

I plan to change mine every 5K with Pennzoil Platinum full synthetic. I will go longer on the non turbo 2.5 but probably not 10K

While it smelled like gas, I think the dilution is minimal because it was never above the full mark on the dipstick unlike the early 1.5T Honda engines that had major dilution and oil way above the full mark on the dipstick because gas dumped into the oil. I am told that Honda fixed that problem.

The '22 has a plastic waffle texture oil pan (a first in the whole of my life) with drain bolt paint marked to properly torque with the paint mark on the metal base at the plastic pan. The '21 2.5 has a conventional steel pan.

The crush washer is a true dual layer "crush washer" unlike any I have seen in over 40 years of changing oil. $1.00 at the dealer.

The oil filter for both the 1.5 and 2.5 is even smaller than the tiny Honda filters and there's room enough for a larger filter from the Nissan truck or the Honda XG7317. I don't know if that voids the warranty??

If you plan to keep the 1.5 for a long time, change early and often. I haven't decided which I'll trade on my Silverado EV. The only advantage of the 1.5 is MUCH better MPG. 28.6 vs 22.8 over 3,000 miles.
 

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I did the '22 1.5T 3cyl oil change at 3,000 miles. It is different from my '21 Rogue 2.5 also done at 3,000 miles

Both '21 and 22 require removing the belly pan. Two 10mm bolts and 12-15 plastic push pins. Chrysler had a better idea with a flip down access panel on my '17 Pacifica.

The 1.5 used oil was the thinnest oil I've ever seen. It flowed like green/brown water and reeked of gasoline. I've had plenty of other cars with 0W20 oil and none have been like water on an oil change. It is definitely the thinnest and probably the nastiest looking and smelling oil in my experience and only after 3K miles.

I am stupefied that Nissan calls for a 10,000 mile oil change, a tiny filter fit for a lawnmower, and NO requirement for synthetic oil on a turbo. What's up with that Nissan? I doubt this engine will run 200-300K like a Toyota or Honda.

I plan to change mine every 5K with Pennzoil Platinum full synthetic. I will go longer on the non turbo 2.5 but probably not 10K

While it smelled like gas, I think the dilution is minimal because it was never above the full mark on the dipstick unlike the early 1.5T Honda engines that had major dilution and oil way above the full mark on the dipstick because gas dumped into the oil. I am told that Honda fixed that problem.

The '22 has a plastic waffle texture oil pan (a first in the whole of my life) with drain bolt paint marked to properly torque with the paint mark on the metal base at the plastic pan. The '21 2.5 has a conventional steel pan.

The crush washer is a true dual layer "crush washer" unlike any I have seen in over 40 years of changing oil. $1.00 at the dealer.

The oil filter for both the 1.5 and 2.5 is even smaller than the tiny Honda filters and there's room enough for a larger filter from the Nissan truck or the Honda XG7317. I don't know if that voids the warranty??

If you plan to keep the 1.5 for a long time, change early and often. I haven't decided which I'll trade on my Silverado EV. The only advantage of the 1.5 is MUCH better MPG. 28.6 vs 22.8 over 3,000 miles.
I just clicked 1000 miles in our 2022 SV, 1.5t VC. Like you, I keep my cars for a long time and do all the work myself (currently changing timing components on 2003 explorer with 260,000). I tried to buy a 2021 Rogue to keep it simple with the 2.5. But it didn't go my way.
I plan to have the same strategy as you and change fluids often, especially the CVT. I never had a Nissan before.
I like the car, but feel like a guinea pig with all the trickery in there to get 200hp out of a 1.5l.
I am already looking for manuals, specs, etc, but no luck so far.
Regards
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just clicked 1000 miles in our 2022 SV, 1.5t VC. Like you, I keep my cars for a long time and do all the work myself (currently changing timing components on 2003 explorer with 260,000). I tried to buy a 2021 Rogue to keep it simple with the 2.5. But it didn't go my way.
I plan to have the same strategy as you and change fluids often, especially the CVT. I never had a Nissan before.
I like the car, but feel like a guinea pig with all the trickery in there to get 200hp out of a 1.5l.
I am already looking for manuals, specs, etc, but no luck so far.
Regards
I like the ‘22 especially the MPG but I miss the surround view camera and better initial throttle response of the ‘21.
Re trickery: 200 hp from a 3cyl nonetheless.

I haven’t decided what I’m going to do with changing the CVT fluid at this early stage. Will it be 30k, 50k, or when recommended which I don’t know?

My 2013 Accord CVT had episodes of shudder at about 20k miles. Dealer “could not duplicate” under warranty. After forum chat, I took a chance (voiding my transmission warranty) by changing it myself with Amsoil universal synthetic CVT fluid. It now has 75k miles and has been as smooth as the center seed of a cucumber ever since. I have zero experience with the Nissan CVT and this is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any Nissan CVT concerns. Ask your Nissan dealer if Amsoil Synthetic CVT fluid is right for you.
 

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My 2013 Accord CVT had episodes of shudder at about 20k miles. Dealer “could not duplicate” under warranty. After forum chat, I took a chance (voiding my transmission warranty) by changing it myself with Amsoil universal synthetic CVT fluid. It now has 75k miles and has been as smooth as the center seed of a cucumber ever since. I have zero experience with the Nissan CVT and this is not intended to diagnose, treat, or cure any Nissan CVT concerns. Ask your Nissan dealer if Amsoil Synthetic CVT fluid is right for you.
The trouble with AMSoil is the color. It's great stuff and the warranty does allow for "NS3 equivalent" fluids, but using anything that obviously isn't NS3 could shift the burden of proof from Nissan to you in the event of a warrantable failure. I suggest using Eneos instead, it's also great stuff and pretty much the same color as NS3.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@VStar650CL Good point and it’s very likely I’ll be out of warranty at the first CVT change on the Nissan. Any idea on what the recommended interval is. It wouldn’t surprise me if it’s as early as 30,000 miles for some reason.
 

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@VStar650CL Good point and it’s very likely I’ll be out of warranty at the first CVT change on the Nissan. Any idea on what the recommended interval is. It wouldn’t surprise me if it’s as early as 30,000 miles for some reason.
Most everybody on the Nissan forums recommends changing the CVT fluid every 30,000 MI if not sooner according to your driving style. Reason being, when the fluid stays in too long, the chemical properties of the fluid get compromised and it can no longer provide that cushion that's so needed between the steel belt and the cones. The fluid has two great enemies, and temperature is only one of them. The other is shearing force generated by normal operation of the belt, which increases on hills or with a load. This gradually breaks down and shortens the long-chain molecules that cushion the belt.
 

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Rogo is correct, 30K is generally a good interval for any CVT. The factory recommendations are worse than useless, they're based on keeping official "cost of ownership" low and not what's best for the vehicle. Keep in mind that what makes a CVT go is a metal belt riding on a pair of metal pulleys. It doesn't take rocket science to see why that makes it entirely dependent on the quality of the fluid. With no sacrificial clutch material to protect it like a regular A/T, when the fluid gives out, metal meets metal and it's bye-bye tranny. The "degradation" figures stored in the TCM are also less than useful, because they're only based on temperature and that's half a story. As Rogo just pointed out, the other factor that degrades the fluid is shearing force between the pulleys and belt, which mechanically breaks the tails off the long-chain molecules which provide film strength to cushion the belt. That means if you're a leadfoot, climb a lot of steep hills, or trailer anything heavier than a bicycle, you should cut the interval to 25K or even 20K. Trailering in particular puts unique stresses on both the fluid and belt which beat the fluid up quickly. It doesn't take rocket science to appreciate that situation either, the "back and forth" rocking of the trailer translates directly into an uneven shear load that must be absorbed by the belt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Rogo is correct, 30K is generally a good interval for any CVT. The factory recommendations are worse than useless, they're based on keeping official "cost of ownership" low and not what's best for the vehicle. Keep in mind that what makes a CVT go is a metal belt riding on a pair of metal pulleys. It doesn't take rocket science to see why that makes it entirely dependent on the quality of the fluid. With no sacrificial clutch material to protect it like a regular A/T, when the fluid gives out, metal meets metal and it's bye-bye tranny. The "degradation" figures stored in the TCM are also less than useful, because they're only based on temperature and that's half a story. As Rogo just pointed out, the other factor that degrades the fluid is shearing force between the pulleys and belt, which mechanically breaks the tails off the long-chain molecules which provide film strength to cushion the belt. That means if you're a leadfoot, climb a lot of steep hills, or trailer anything heavier than a bicycle, you should cut the interval to 25K or even 20K. Trailering in particular puts unique stresses on both the fluid and belt which beat the fluid up quickly. It doesn't take rocket science to appreciate that situation either, the "back and forth" rocking of the trailer translates directly into an uneven shear load that must be absorbed by the belt.
Great info, thanks. Methinks I'll do the Accord this summer with 55K miles on the Amsoil.
Most everybody on the Nissan forums recommends changing the CVT fluid every 30,000 MI if not sooner according to your driving style. Reason being, when the fluid stays in too long, the chemical properties of the fluid get compromised and it can no longer provide that cushion that's so needed between the steel belt and the cones. The fluid has two great enemies, and temperature is only one of them. The other is shearing force generated by normal operation of the belt, which increases on hills or with a load. This gradually breaks down and shortens the long-chain molecules that cushion the belt.
More great info. I’ll plan on 30k to be safe. I don’t tow or do tons of hills so 30 should suffice. It’s cheap insurance considering there’s only a need for two CVT fluid changes in 100,000 miles.Will do an approved synthetic oil. OEM if it is synthetic.

I am still baffled that they don’t require synthetic motor oil on a turbo. I don’t remember ever seeing that before on previous turbo cars I’ve owned except for my 1980 300SD.
 

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I am still baffled that they don’t require synthetic motor oil on a turbo. I don’t remember ever seeing that before on previous turbo cars I’ve owned except for my 1980 300SD.
I suspect that's just more "cost of ownership" crap. I'd imagine it's just as hard for Nissan's Engineering Department to swallow as it is for us technicians, but the realities of marketing and sales are what they are. None of us in the supporting cast would have jobs without it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I suspect that's just more "cost of ownership" crap. I'd imagine it's just as hard for Nissan's Engineering Department to swallow as it is for us technicians, but the realities of marketing and sales are what they are. None of us in the supporting cast would have jobs without it.
I concur.
While Nissan does not use the word synthetic in any of their literature, the SP rating includes only synthetic or synthetic blend oil’s. I’m not a fan of synthetic blend oil’s and Ford is the only other manufacturer I’m familiar with that allows for synthetic blend in a turbo charged engine.
 
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