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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife's SL Platinum with push button start decided yesterday to give a dash light (security key) after starting and went out a while after driving. Parked it and 90 minutes later it wouldn't start. Battery seemed dead. Boosted it and it came alive but same light came on along with a key not recognized message. Went and had battery and alt tested a few minutes after that. AOK. Light went out after restart. Put battery maintainer on it to bring it full charge. Was drawing 4amp(max) and about 13.2V. Left it 10 hours or so to get it full. Then left it another 10 hrs and battery seemed weak again. Took it back to station and they double checked everything good. I decided to change the 4 yr old remote batteries. When I went to car it now won't recognize any keys.

After reading manual I somehow managed to get it started using the dead remote procedure touching the push button start. The process didn't work like stated in the manual but somehow I got it running with some cues from the dash and drove it down my lane and back from neighbours with message on dash stating not recognizing key and the general warning signal. Seems like I'm going to have to get it to a Nissan dealer (hope it starts again, and actually drives without shutting off LOL) to have it reprogrammed or fix whatever may be wrong.

Anyone have a similar experience or any helpful advice?

Thank you
 

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Admin and Sup Mod keeping the peace
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A properly working charging system puts out about 13.2 to 15.0 volts. A battery should have a static charge of 12.2-12.6 volts. If a battery is not good, the charging system may not be able to charge properly. If a vehicle is not charging properly and the battery is good, the first thing to do is to turn the ignition switch to the "ON" position without starting the engine and make sure the charging system warning light is operating. If the bulb is burnt out, the charging system will not charge. If the bulb is OK but still does not illuminate, the circuit must be tested. If the warning lamp does illuminate, then the next thing to check is to make sure the circuit between the battery positive post (+), or fusible link, to the connection in back of the alternator is good. On Nissans, this should be a thick (approx. 10 gauge) wire to the "BAT" post on the back of the alternator. With the negative cable (-) disconnected from the battery, measure the resistance between the "BAT" post on the back of the alternator and the battery positive (+) post; the resistance should not be greater then 0.2 Ohms. It's not uncommon for this wire to get corroded and burn up, creating resistance in the circuit. So, before assuming an alternator is bad, make sure this circuit is good and battery voltage is getting to the alternator. It's also important to make sure the alternator belt is tight and not slipping and the battery connections are clean and tight.

Assuming the charging system voltage is ok and the battery is good, the next thing to do would be to have a parasitic draw test performed; there should not be more than a 50 milliamp draw on the system with the ignition switch in the "OFF" position. If there is a higher draw, you need to do some testing to find out where the draw is coming from. Remove fuses one at a time until the draw goes away or falls into acceptable range. If you do these tests, make sure all accessories inside the car are shut off; this includes any courtesy lights such as the overhead lights. If the hood has an opening security sensor, it must be disabled. All the doors and trunk must be closed; if you need to have the driver's door open, put something against the door button to keep it pressed in order to break the electrical circuit.

When a charging system is not charging, or overcharging, a lot of "strange" things can occur. It's not uncommon to see a multiple of stored trouble codes in the ECM memory. So, whenever a car is setting a multiple of trouble codes, idling funny or stalling, or anything out of the "norm," test the charging system before you start pulling hairs!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A properly working charging system puts out about 13.2 to 15.0 volts. A battery should have a static charge of 12.2-12.6 volts. If a battery is not good, the charging system may not be able to charge properly. If a vehicle is not charging properly and the battery is good, the first thing to do is to turn the ignition switch to the "ON" position without starting the engine and make sure the charging system warning light is operating. If the bulb is burnt out, the charging system will not charge. If the bulb is OK but still does not illuminate, the circuit must be tested. If the warning lamp does illuminate, then the next thing to check is to make sure the circuit between the battery positive post (+), or fusible link, to the connection in back of the alternator is good. On Nissans, this should be a thick (approx. 10 gauge) wire to the "BAT" post on the back of the alternator. With the negative cable (-) disconnected from the battery, measure the resistance between the "BAT" post on the back of the alternator and the battery positive (+) post; the resistance should not be greater then 0.2 Ohms. It's not uncommon for this wire to get corroded and burn up, creating resistance in the circuit. So, before assuming an alternator is bad, make sure this circuit is good and battery voltage is getting to the alternator. It's also important to make sure the alternator belt is tight and not slipping and the battery connections are clean and tight.

Assuming the charging system voltage is ok and the battery is good, the next thing to do would be to have a parasitic draw test performed; there should not be more than a 50 milliamp draw on the system with the ignition switch in the "OFF" position. If there is a higher draw, you need to do some testing to find out where the draw is coming from. Remove fuses one at a time until the draw goes away or falls into acceptable range. If you do these tests, make sure all accessories inside the car are shut off; this includes any courtesy lights such as the overhead lights. If the hood has an opening security sensor, it must be disabled. All the doors and trunk must be closed; if you need to have the driver's door open, put something against the door button to keep it pressed in order to break the electrical circuit.

When a charging system is not charging, or overcharging, a lot of "strange" things can occur. It's not uncommon to see a multiple of stored trouble codes in the ECM memory. So, whenever a car is setting a multiple of trouble codes, idling funny or stalling, or anything out of the "norm," test the charging system before you start pulling hairs!
Thanks for the detailed reply on the charging system. I may have put too much emphasis on this and as I mentioned this has been checked twice now and I'm told is fine. The real problem seems to be in the immobilizer system and not recognizing keys, and allowing normal operation. However, will investigate all further.

I am surprised something like this can happen, and that it takes over a week to get an appointment at the dealer to diagnose when they say it is considered an emergency to them. LOL
 

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Thanks for the detailed reply on the charging system. I may have put too much emphasis on this and as I mentioned this has been checked twice now and I'm told is fine. The real problem seems to be in the immobilizer system and not recognizing keys, and allowing normal operation. However, will investigate all further.

I am surprised something like this can happen, and that it takes over a week to get an appointment at the dealer to diagnose when they say it is considered an emergency to them. LOL
You mentioned in your first post that the battery after a 10 hr charge seemed to be weak; the battery should have a static charge of 12.2-12.6 volts when the car is shut off. Get the battery load tested at an auto parts store. If the battery is good but not holding the charge, there may be a parasitic draw in the electrical system; there should not be more than a 50 milliamp draw on the system with the ignition switch in the "OFF" position. If there is a higher draw, you need to do some testing to find out where the draw is coming from. Remove fuses one at a time until the draw goes away or falls into acceptable range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You mentioned in your first post that the battery after a 10 hr charge seemed to be weak; the battery should have a static charge of 12.2-12.6 volts when the car is shut off. Get the battery load tested at an auto parts store. If the battery is good but not holding the charge, there may be a parasitic draw in the electrical system; there should not be more than a 50 milliamp draw on the system with the ignition switch in the "OFF" position. If there is a higher draw, you need to do some testing to find out where the draw is coming from. Remove fuses one at a time until the draw goes away or falls into acceptable range.
Thanks for the response and info. Getting that test soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A properly working charging system puts out about 13.2 to 15.0 volts. A battery should have a static charge of 12.2-12.6 volts. If a battery is not good, the charging system may not be able to charge properly. If a vehicle is not charging properly and the battery is good, the first thing to do is to turn the ignition switch to the "ON" position without starting the engine and make sure the charging system warning light is operating. If the bulb is burnt out, the charging system will not charge. If the bulb is OK but still does not illuminate, the circuit must be tested. If the warning lamp does illuminate, then the next thing to check is to make sure the circuit between the battery positive post (+), or fusible link, to the connection in back of the alternator is good. On Nissans, this should be a thick (approx. 10 gauge) wire to the "BAT" post on the back of the alternator. With the negative cable (-) disconnected from the battery, measure the resistance between the "BAT" post on the back of the alternator and the battery positive (+) post; the resistance should not be greater then 0.2 Ohms. It's not uncommon for this wire to get corroded and burn up, creating resistance in the circuit. So, before assuming an alternator is bad, make sure this circuit is good and battery voltage is getting to the alternator. It's also important to make sure the alternator belt is tight and not slipping and the battery connections are clean and tight.

Assuming the charging system voltage is ok and the battery is good, the next thing to do would be to have a parasitic draw test performed; there should not be more than a 50 milliamp draw on the system with the ignition switch in the "OFF" position. If there is a higher draw, you need to do some testing to find out where the draw is coming from. Remove fuses one at a time until the draw goes away or falls into acceptable range. If you do these tests, make sure all accessories inside the car are shut off; this includes any courtesy lights such as the overhead lights. If the hood has an opening security sensor, it must be disabled. All the doors and trunk must be closed; if you need to have the driver's door open, put something against the door button to keep it pressed in order to break the electrical circuit.

When a charging system is not charging, or overcharging, a lot of "strange" things can occur. It's not uncommon to see a multiple of stored trouble codes in the ECM memory. So, whenever a car is setting a multiple of trouble codes, idling funny or stalling, or anything out of the "norm," test the charging system before you start pulling hairs!
I forgot about coming back here earlier but wanted all to know my problem was resolved with a new battery. It was erratic sometimes testing ok and other times not. In the end it was only putting out low low amperage IIRC something like 150. Changed that and had to reprogram the keys/car and it was good as new.
 
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