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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've emailed the dealer and am waiting to hear back about this, but I can't figure out if my fiance's GXE from 01 has ABS or not. Usually that would mean no, but the 115 point inspection that Autolines did here in Mass. had ABS checked off as a safety feature. But online, all I'm seeing is that it was an option on the GXE trim level. I bought this car used in December 2003, and even the owner's manual doesn't tell you for sure...how can I tell without actually waiting to slip in some snow this winter? I figure it might say ABS on the dash or something but no dice. Can anyone tell me? I have the VIN if that will help but I'm thinking trying to get standard features off the VIN will again come up with ABS optional (that's what the CARFAX report even said).

Thanks
Newbie.
 

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ABS is not a standard feature check for ABS fuses and stuff....
 

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you know there is a quick solution to this ! ! !

go out with the car and see if it will skid when you slam on the brakes

no skid and smooth stop= ABS
skid with tires squeeling= No ABS

i would recomend doing this on a smooth surface and not rough cuz you don't want to eat your tires away ! and go at it with a reasonable speed

have fun with that
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
so it looks like only Blank actually read the post :)

I said that i know it's not a standard feature and i don't want to have to test it out by trying to skid here. Thanks anyway, guys.

Blank - I'll check the dummy lights next time she starts it; good call.
 

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what, you can't handle checking for abs fuses like I said? geez.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
chimmike said:
what, you can't handle checking for abs fuses like I said? geez.
I could, but I've already confirmed they're not there - thanks anyway.

Calm down, by the way.

That's beside the point anyway - ABS should either come with a trim level or not come with it. It shouldn't have been an option on the GXE in 2001 to begin with, it should have been standard.

In any event, I'm going to sell it when next winter starts creeping up and get my fiance into something with ABS and/or AWD.
 

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well i think actually testing it would have been a little more exciting!
 

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fju2112 said:
I could, but I've already confirmed they're not there - thanks anyway.

Calm down, by the way.

That's beside the point anyway - ABS should either come with a trim level or not come with it. It shouldn't have been an option on the GXE in 2001 to begin with, it should have been standard.

In any event, I'm going to sell it when next winter starts creeping up and get my fiance into something with ABS and/or AWD.
Said in a nutshell, ABS is over rated. I am glad Nissan did not pop an ABS chip in every car they make. Driver skill can easy make up for ABS. In dry, their is absolutely no need for ABS. In fact, ABS slows the stops for skilled drivers. Many skilled drivers in snow will explain that locking the wheels in snow actually makes a car stop fast because of the build resistance. Only in ice may ABS be more important. Threshold braking makes up for the shortcomming of ABS. ABS is a wear item, adds more money on the car and not all drivers want it. Quite a few drivers on the board here will concur with me.

What is threshold braking?

"We discussed briefly above that maximum theoretical braking effort is obtained just before the point of wheel lock. Threshold braking is the subtle driver technique which attempts to approach this ideal as closely as possible. It will involve great sensitivity on the brake pedal. Thin soled shoes are a significant advantage. But knowing when wheels start to lock is more of a mystery. How can a driver know from the driving seat that wheels are close to locking?

We've never seen this in print anywhere, but we believe that the messages arrive through the steering wheel. As the front wheels tend to lock small tugs can be felt through the wheel actually pulling away from the locking road wheel. When these tugs are felt is the right time to ease off the brake pedal a fraction and stay at the threshold without exceeding it." (I highly agree with this)

"ABS provides a close approximation of threshold braking, and in an ABS equipped vehicle you might as well normally plant the brake pedal and leave it to the electronics. That said, good threshold braking is better than ABS and can stop you shorter. However, although it is possible to threshold brake in an ABS equipped car, sometimes the ABS will interfere with the subtle steering messages and actually make threshold braking harder."

from here
http://www.safespeed.org.uk/braking.html
 
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