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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I care for an elderly relative and I took her car for an oil change. It reeked of gas and the mileage was absolutely horrible. Needless to say, the oil change worker refused to change the oil as the fuel lines were leaking over his head (near the engine).

I've never driven a Nissan and she's too broke to go to a mechanic, so I volunteered to do it for her and I need your help (much appreciated) with the following:

1- What do I need to prep for?
2- How do I drain the fuel before repair?
3- How do I go about the diagnosis?
4- Any tips for removing damaged clamps/parts?
5- What are the specs of the replacement lines?
6- What clamps/parts need changed w/ the lines?

Or is there a guide or tutorial for the repair/part needed? I'd greatly appreciate your help, and I thank you all in advance for your time and effort.

Thank you 🙂
Milo
 

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NF Mod/Nissan Master Tech
2006 Pathfinder LE, 2003 Frontier SVE
Joined
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10,659 Posts
Anytime you work around gasoline or gas fumes, you have to be careful of not causing any sparks that could ignition the fuel and cause a fire. Make sure you have a fire extinguisher close by just in case! To depressurize the system, you need to remove the fuel pump fuse and start the engine. Most likely, it will run for a few seconds and then stall out. Then, crank the engine for about 5-10 seconds to depressurize the system further. When done, turn the key off and loosen the gas cap to relieve any fuel vapor pressure in the tank. It's also a good idea to (carefully) disconnect the negative battery cable from the battery post and position it safely out of the way. If you replace any fuel line hose, make sure you get "fuel injection hose" and not regular gas hose. Also, don't use worm gear clamps; use fuel injection hose clamps. Many auto part stores will sell a kit with a length a fuel injection hose and some clamps for small repairs, or you can purchase the hose in bulk form, cut to order and the clamps separately. If you have an old fuel injection hose that is difficult to remove, spray some carb cleaner on it and it will soften it up. If it's a rusted line that's leaking, that's a little more complicated. Pre-bent sections of gas line may be available from Nissan, but probably as a long assembly that may contain the brake lines, as well, that can be expensive to ship and difficult to install without a lift. Specific sections of the fuel line can be replaced using whole or cut lengths of metal tubing and double-flared fittings and unions (preferred) or compression fittings. Flared fittings would require a double-flare tool to make the flares on the end(s) of the lines. Without knowing exactly what is leaking, it's impossible to say how simple or difficult the repair will be and what will be needed to fix it. If you can get a picture of the leak and post it, it would be very helpful!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Anytime you work around gasoline or gas fumes, you have to be careful of not causing any sparks that could ignition the fuel and cause a fire. Make sure you have a fire extinguisher close by just in case! To depressurize the system, you need to remove the fuel pump fuse and start the engine. Most likely, it will run for a few seconds and then stall out. Then, crank the engine for about 5-10 seconds to depressurize the system further. When done, turn the key off and loosen the gas cap to relieve any fuel vapor pressure in the tank. It's also a good idea to (carefully) disconnect the negative battery cable from the battery post and position it safely out of the way. If you replace any fuel line hose, make sure you get "fuel injection hose" and not regular gas hose. Also, don't use worm gear clamps; use fuel injection hose clamps. Many auto part stores will sell a kit with a length a fuel injection hose and some clamps for small repairs, or you can purchase the hose in bulk form, cut to order and the clamps separately. If you have an old fuel injection hose that is difficult to remove, spray some carb cleaner on it and it will soften it up. If it's a rusted line that's leaking, that's a little more complicated. Pre-bent sections of gas line may be available from Nissan, but probably as a long assembly that may contain the brake lines, as well, that can be expensive to ship and difficult to install without a lift. Specific sections of the fuel line can be replaced using whole or cut lengths of metal tubing and double-flared fittings and unions (preferred) or compression fittings. Flared fittings would require a double-flare tool to make the flares on the end(s) of the lines. Without knowing exactly what is leaking, it's impossible to say how simple or difficult the repair will be and what will be needed to fix it. If you can get a picture of the leak and post it, it would be very helpful!
Thank you kindly 🙂
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hello,

Attached are the best photos I could get of the possible leak in the fuel lines. I also took photos of the engine bay to see if you guys can find something that needs attention or repair.

I was also wondering if someone can tell me the size of those lines and what hardware I need to get with the replacement lines.


Regards,
Milo
 

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NF Mod/Nissan Master Tech
2006 Pathfinder LE, 2003 Frontier SVE
Joined
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10,659 Posts
I couldn't see the photos with the link you provided. If you have the photos downloaded to your device, you could use the insert photo or attachment at the bottom of the page or use a service like Imgur to post a link inside your thread.
 
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