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  • smj999smj ·
    Most common causes for EGR codes are usually a burnt up and leaking BPT hose, a bad EGR control solenoid valve and/or built up carbon on the intake manifold or the small EGR pipe from the manifold to the BPT valve. I can't tell you what your mechanic did.
    gsnorules ·
    I have a 96 Altima. A code P0400 was present. My mechanic first replaced the EGR. Still threw a Code P0400. Then he said it was the EGR switch. The EGR diaphram was still not moving up & down. I left the car there, then picked it up after he said it was the switch that had to be ordered. But I noticed that he unplugged some vacuum lines, then plugged them back again. The EGR now works. No codes after I cleared the PCM. No more Light. But he still says I need a Switch thet he order from Nissan. What he do to fix the P0400 code/EGR/ Vacumm thats he's no telling me? Strange.
    smj999smj ·
    I answered this in the forum for you (I saw it there first before checking my messages). Basically, as I said there, there really is no way to tell. If you are experiencing any "shudder" at highway speeds, I would be concerned and take it back to the dealer.
    1981zx ·
    In re: this tranny/radiator issue, My 05 PF is 3,200 miles away. The VDC light was coming on at high speeds along with some other problems. I took it into a Nissan dealership, and the tech told me that he found transmission fluid in my antifreeze, or vice-versa. He then discussed this issue with me. I have read your expert posts. Here's my question: If I have the radiator replaced and the transmission flushed, will my transmission be OK? Or is it damaged already? Especially important, because I want to decide whether to drive it back with this condition. It is an '05 with 128K miles.
    curvecrazy ·
    You seem to know a lot about the 05 pathfinder radiators. Which should I buy and should I re-activate the trans. oil cooler setup or buy one with no tranny oil cooler? Do you think bypassing will cause harm long term? And what is this you mentioned in your Nissan letter about foam seals replaced when you replaced your radiator? Does the core thickness of the radiator matter? I see they vary. Thanks George
    smj999smj ·
    Most of the mechanical parts are available on the aftermarket (timing chains, brake parts, etc.). I use RockAuto Auto Parts a lot for generic car parts for their prices, selection and service. When it comes to electronic or electrical parts, it's best to go with genuine Nissan when you can (starters, alternators, distributors) if you plan to stay "stock." For Z-car part vendors, here are some links:

    Z Car Parts.com -- Motorsport Auto -- Home
    Black Dragon Automotive - Datsun 240Z, 260Z, 280Z, 280ZX and Mazda RX7 Auto Parts and Accessories
    ZPARTS.COM | 240Z 260Z 280Z 280ZX 300ZX | PARTS

    If you run into any "snags," feel free to message me!
    smj999smj ·
    One magazine you may enjoy is Nissan Sport Magazine, which caters to all Nissans but has some good articles on the early Z's as well as advertisers that deal in Z parts and a good listing of Z-car clubs. If there is a Z-car club in your area, it might be a good idea to get involved with it.There are a number of Z-car events across the country. As far as literature, go to Barnes & Nobles website ( Barnes & Noble - Books, Textbooks, eBooks, Toys, Games, DVDs and More ) and search "Datsun 280Z" in books. You'll find a number of books available. Another good purchase would be a 1978 Datsun 280Z factory service manual. Personally, I prefer the ol' paper manual and you might be able to find a good, used one on Ebay. There are also downloads available and the manual on CD, if you choose. Just Google-search it. Google is also great for finding info on the web. I'm sure there's more than one early Z specific forum, as well.
    smj999smj ·
    The Datsun 280Z is sorta the "Ford Mustang" of Asian cars. There is a ton of information from a multitude of sources. '78 was the last of the first generation Z's which started in '69 (only 500 made that year). Up to '74 they used a 2.4L with twin carbs. The early Z's had the better carbs, whereas the late 240's and the 260Z had carbs that were famous for vapor lock due to the location of the fuel bowl that would boil the fuel on hot days. The 260Z, with it's slightly bigger engine, only lasted one year: 1974. I had one; it was junk! In 75, Nissan went to multiport fuel injection and days of the tempermental carbs were over! In '79, the 280ZX arrived with it's slightly larger body. The 2-seater is by far the most popular as may find the "roof hump" of the 2+2 unattractive. It's still a fun car and for a sports car, not too bad to work on. Many parts are still available through Nissan and the aftermarket has increased greatly over the last few years.
    rikkihoffecker ·
    Hi. Complete newbee here. Just bought a 78 280 zx 2x2. I know almost nothing about nissan products. (or any Japanees cars or anything built after 1973)[[long story]] But you sound as if you do. I have never posted a note on a forum either as I said "complete newbee"... So I have many questions about literature available on the net about my particular car. Could you direct me to a sight? Or, perchance inquire of you from time to time or if you could recomend someone who might help me That would rok.
    Thank you. rikkihoffecker
    smj999smj ·
    Nissan started using them back on the A33 Maximas and B14 Sentra, IIRC. It helps prevent brake squeek by pushing the pads off the rotor when the brakes are released.
    rogoman ·
    I noticed that on all late model Altima's, the front brake pads use pad retractors that hook into the pad wear sensors. Do you know anything about these? It seems that most of the other models don't use them.
    smj999smj ·
    Honestly, I haven't had to do too many; I left Nissan in Oct., 2003, so I really didn't do too many rear brake jobs on them. Usually a little P-blaster and a small wire brush to clean the area around the center hub and a big "whack" of a big hammer squarly against the hub is all I've ever used to break the rotor loose and pull it off if it doesn't have the threaded holes in it.
    rogoman ·
    Hey SMJ,
    On a late model Altima like an '04 and later, the rear brake rotors are sometimes very difficult to remove. Unfortunately there are no threaded holes in the rotors for "pusher" bolts to screw into for popping the rotor off. Do you have any good tricks for taking the rotors off?
    smj999smj ·
    Yeah, the breather was known to leak at times; I think there was a TSB on it. R&R'ing that to reaseal it is no picnic, either!
    jrc2905 ·
    Just wanted to let you know, it is not the timing cover, it is coming from the box that the PVC valve is mounted on, thank god. thanks for the help I did learn a very important lesson on the timing chain cover. John
    jrc2905 ·
    Thanks for the answer now I am beginning to understand. I will check today to see if my patch job works. I see that you spend a lot of time here helping people and that is nice of you to give the time. I think I have a leak because this time I followed the FSM and did not put gasket material in the grove by the oil hole. One last question. If all goes well how long should it take to remove and replace the timing cover, and do you leave the head gasket section on the top in place or cut it out and use gasket maker there. I appreciate the help I try to keep these cars going for my family who cannot afford to buy new.
    smj999smj ·
    Note: If the ALtima is a 93 GXE and has the drivshaft support carrier bolted to the oil pan, my "board method" won't apply as you have to remove the carrier support.
    smj999smj ·
    I used a 2X4 that was about 18" long (doesn't have to be exactly that long). I would place it in the area between the front of the control arm and under the right driveshaft. The board has to run under the driveshaft carrier support bracket. Now, I would always have the car on a lift and when I removed the engine mount at the front of the engine (to the passenger side of the engine compartment), I would use a jackstand with a piece of would on the top to support the engine. So, raising the vehicle would cause the engine to drop, and doing so with the board in place, the board would wedge between the drivshaft and control arm. The engine, when placed right, will sort of drop then tilt a bit toward the radiator. Eventually the board takes the load of the jackstand and one can continue to raise the vehicle and the front of engine is support without the aid of the jackstand. In this position, the front cover has just enough room to be removed and reinstalled. When I reinstall it.
    jrc2905 ·
    Hi I was reading your post about using a 2x4 when removing the timing cover. I just did a total rebuild on my altima engine and I have an oil leak at the oil channel location between the cover and the engine. I dread removing this cover and said I would never do it with the engine in the car. According to your post you say you use a 2x4 as a block but I am not clear on where you put and when you say that you lower the engine are you using jack or a hoist? I did remove the bolt from that area and loaded it up with RTV sealant to see if I can force the sealant into that area. If you have dine as many as you say you must have a procedure that work because it is one horrible job to do, thanks John.
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